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The problem with this method in the PIC microcontroller is that division cannot be implemented easily. Thus, instead of multiplying by a fraction, a constant value for a particular denominator is used. For the PIC microcontroller, a denominator of 256 or 65,536 (0x0100 or 0x010000) is probably the best way of doing this. Using this method, instead of multiplying 123 by 3 and then dividing by 10, 123 can be multiplied by the fractional value of 256 and then divided by 256 to get the actual value. This is shown below: 30% of 123 [123 (30% of 256)]/0x0100 (123 77)/0x0100 9,471/0x0100 0x024FF/0x0100 0x024 36
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The seven-segment LED driver code and hardware speci ed within this application can be used for a variety of purposes. Different character sets (i.e., hex codes) and additional and different displays can be implemented easily by modifying or cutting and pasting this code into another application.
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MaryaToy: ADDENDUM TO THE ELECTRONIC THERMOMETER
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After I built the LED thermometer, my daughter, who was 18 months old at the time, found it absolutely fascinating with its LED displays. In fact, I had a lot of problems trying to keep her from wanting to play with it. The obvious solution for me was to come up with a toy for her that had lights and buttons that would respond to her inputs (Fig. 21.33). This also was a good chance for me to experiment with other types of LED displays. The display that I used is a 15-segment alphanumeric display. This display is very similar to the seven-segment displays of the electronic thermometer except that it has a lot more
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Figure 21.33 The child s toy created using a PIC16F84, some buffers, and six 15-segment LED displays.
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segments, as you can see in the ASCII-Art drawing below. In this diagram, I have shown how I numbered each of the segments.
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---1--|\ | /| 6 91011 2 | \|/ | -7- -8| /|\ | 5121314 3 |/ | \| ---4---
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The most signi cant part of this project was guring out how to drive these displays. Ideally, I wanted to use a simple PIC microcontroller (a PIC16C84 at the time). Actually, this was quite easy to do because of the experience I got from doing a Frosty the Snowman display that was a precursor to the Christmas tree display I presented earlier in this chapter, along with the digital thermometer that was presented in the preceding section. The circuit I came up with (originally) is shown in Fig. 21.34. Six 15-digit displays were wired in parallel like the three seven-segment display of the digital thermometer, with each digit driven from an output of the 74LS374. For selecting which display is active, I used a 74S138 rather than a single transistor. In this way, up to eight displays can be handled without additional components. Conceptually, the wiring of the display is very simple; in actuality, when you wire it, you ll feel like you are going blind. I suggest that you buy a display with multiple digits that just have multiple common-cathode connections for each of the digits within the display. For my prototype, I used displays with two digits built in (and two common cathodes). The bill of materials for this project is listed in Table 21.14. Despite essentially halving the amount of wiring, I still found that it took me a whole afternoon to point-to-point wire the displays to the current-limiting resistors connected to the 74LS374s. The displays that I used have their pins on the top and bottom of the packages, which makes daisy chaining the wiring quite dif cult to do (I was able to do it in the digital thermometer relatively easily). The mainline code simply updates a 6-byte array called Disp that consists of the ASCII codes (from 0x020 to 0x05F) that are currently displayed on the 15-segment LEDs. TMR0 was enabled along with its interrupt request, and each time it over ows (every 512 instruction cycles, or every 512 s because the PIC microcontroller is running with a 4-MHz clock), the character in each Disp element is output on its respective 15-segment LED display. The 512- s interval between digit displays gives an overall display frequency of 325 Hz, which is icker-free and provides an acceptably bright output. I say that the display is acceptably bright because the output is essentially a PWM with the duty cycle being one-sixth or 16 percent of a total cycle. I found that the interrupt handler required 162 instruction cycles of the 512 instruction cycles available. I am mentioning this because you should be aware of the 30 percent overhead that the display interrupt handler operation places on the PIC microcontroller s execution. This turned out to be something to be aware of when I ported the code to PICBASIC in the next section.
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