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TABLE 21.23 REGISTER
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MIC-II REGISTER DEFINITIONS FUNCTION
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Accumulator (the destination for all arithmetic operations) Goto return address Program counter Flags register General-purpose registers I/O port data bits I/P port tristate control (TRIS) bits Serial receive/transmit register
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The F (or ags) register contains the result of arithmetic STATUS along with the serial receive/transmit status. This register is continually updated after each instruction or as the serial interface receives or transmits data. The ags bits are arranged as shown in Table 21.24. The high 4 bits are the complement of their low nybble counterpart to allow the skip on bit set to work for all conditions. Note that the ags register cannot be written to from either the user interface or the application. If the register is written to in the application a No instruction halts execution. This means that a breakpoint instruction in the MIC-II is
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> F ; Invalid Write to Flags Register
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TABLE 21.24 BIT
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MIC-II FLAG REGISTER DEFINITION FUNCTION
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Carry ag, set on addition greater than 0x100 or subtraction less than 0 Zero ag, set on arithmetic result equal to 0 Receiver byte waiting Transmitter free Not carry ag Not zero ag Not receiver byte waiting Not transmitter free
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A nop in the MIC-II is a goto (@) instruction pointing to the next instruction in the program memory. The UART (universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter) built into the MIC-II is a three times sampling NRZ software handler using the PIC16F84 s TMR0. The timer algorithm (and code) used is essentially identical to that of the YAP-IIs. When the application is running (using the R command), a Ctrl-C (ASCII 0x003) byte will stop the application running, or you can insert the breakpoint instruction (> F), as discussed earlier. I should point out that at some point it would be interesting to port the MIC-II code to a PIC microcontroller that has a built-in UART to simplify operation of the application code. The three special-purpose registers are the P, T, and X registers. P and T are the PORTB and TRISB registers of the PIC microcontroller and operate identically as to how they work in the PIC microcontroller. When a 0 is written to a T bit, the corresponding PORTB bit will be put into output mode. When a 1 is written to a T bit, the corresponding PORTB bit will be in input mode. The X register, when written to, transmits the byte and, when read from, reads the last received character (or 0x000 if there isn t an unread character). Data should not be written to until the transmitter free bit is set, and while data is being sent, the transmitter free bit will be reset. When a character is available for reading, the receiver byte waiting bit will be set. Reading from the X register will reset this bit. As I indicated earlier, the monitor program will poll the incoming data, and when a Ctrl-C is received, execution will end. With the instructions, architecture, and peripheral devices de ned, I then turned my attention toward the user interface. As I indicated earlier, this interface consists of an NRZ serial interface running at 1,200 bps with an 8-N-1 data packet format. Any commercially available RS-232-level translator can be used to interface the circuit to a host computer. When the MIC-II is executing, it behaves as if it is an emulator controlling the processor. The prompt that I came up with for the user is
[Label:...] PC ACC Flags Ins > _
where!Label PC ACC Flags Ins
label at the current address program counter accumulator zero and carry ags the disassembled instruction at the program counter
You probably will note the similarity to this prompt to the one I used for the EMU-II. The different commands that can be entered into the MIC-II are listed in Table 21.25. To set the label positions, rst specify the address you want the label at. To do this, assign the desired address to the C register. Next, put in the !Label command on the next line. Figure 21.48 shows the process for running the MIC-II application code in a PIC16F84 that is in a YAP-II socket. After starting the MIC-II application running at 4 MHz, I change the program counter C to address 4. With the instruction at address 4 displayed, I then enter !A to indicate that the A Label should move to this address. The nal line of Fig. 21.48 shows label A assigned to address 4.
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