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Figure D.21 A digital storage oscilloscope records a waveform in memory, allowing it to be output immediately to the oscilloscope s screen or saved for later analysis.
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LOGIC ANALYZERS AND STATE ANALYZERS
A logic analyzer borrows a lot of the technology from the digital oscilloscope discussed in the preceding section. The logic analyzer, as shown in Fig. D.22, uses the incoming multiple-line data pattern for the trigger and then loads its memory with the bit data until it is full. Logic analyzers tend to be quite expensive, although there is a trend today by some manufacturers to include logic analyzer capabilities with a digital oscilloscope. Instead of recording digital representations of analog data, digital logic values are recorded at various points in the circuit. Logic analyzers are much more dif cult to use within a circuit because of the number of connections to be made and the need to label signals on the display and come up with a pattern to compare against to trigger the sample. To help cut down on the need to reenter data, most logic analyzers have a disk or nonvolatile memory built into them to save speci c steps. Logic analyzers can present data in two different ways. A graphical logic display, such as Fig. D.23, is useful in looking at signals and comparing them with simulator output or even circuit drawings. The second type of display is a state display, and a clock is used to strobe data into the memory rather than saving the data according to a logic analyzer internal clock. This type of display is best suited for monitoring the execution of an application, and if the data and addresses are captured, it can be a fast and inexpensive way of creating a processor emulator/tracer. The two most critical parameters of the logic analyzer are the speed at which data can be processed and the depth of memory behind each pin. The need for fast memory should be obvious.
Display Memory Pins to Circuit Comparator + Trigger Clock Stop A == B Clock Start Addr Counter
Compare Value
Controller
Setup Saves
Figure D.22 The logic analyzer s block diagram is very similar to that of the digital storage oscilloscope except that the output of the multiple lines is stored for later display rather than the limited oscilloscope inputs.
MISCELLANEOUS ELECTRONIC REFERENCE INFORMATION
SignalA SignalB SignalC.0 SignalC.1 SignalC.2 Area to Zoom In on to Check SignalC.2:0 Changes within Circuit Specification
Figure D.23 Depending on the time base, you may nd that there are situations in the logic analyzer where you cannot readily determine the relationship between certain signals without changing the time base or getting additional samples.
The depth relates to how much data can be stored and, more important, how much you can zoom in on a problem. In Fig. D.23, channels SignalC1, SignalC2, and SignalC3 are supposed to all change at the same point. To con rm this, you would want to check these transitions by zooming in to see what is actually happening. A logic analyzer with insuf cient depth would not be able to display any data except at current resolution. To go to a higher resolution, another picture would have to be taken.
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BASIC PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE
The Beginner s All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) language has been used by new computer programmers for over 30 years. It became a staple of new computer programmers when it was included with the Apple II computer in the mid-1970s. One of the aspects that made BASIC popular was its integrated development environment the program itself could be used for entering, running, and debugging applications. Owing to the nature of the PIC microcontroller, this capability is rarely available except in deliberate applications such as BASIC87x. In its original form, the BASIC language is somewhat unstructured, although Microsoft has done a lot to enhance the language and make it easier to work with, starting with GW BASIC that was shipped with the rst IBM PCs, QBASIC, and then Visual Basic. In the rst part of this appendix I would like to introduce you to the BASIC language, with Microsoft s extensions, and following this, PICBASIC (which is provided by microEngineering Labs). BASIC variables do not have to be declared except in specialized cases. The variable name itself follows normal conventions of a letter or _ character as the rst character, followed by alphanumeric characters and _ for variable names. Variable (and address label) names may be case-sensitive depending on the version. To specify data types, a suf x character is added to the end of the variable name, as shown in Table E.1. In Microsoft BASIC, the DIM statement can be used to specify a variable type:
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