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A = (B * C) + D
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would be expected to execute in the following order:
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1 Multiply the contents of B with the contents of C. 2 Add D to the product of B and C. 3 Store the result in A.
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In PBASIC, the addition would execute rst, followed by the multiplication. Written out, this would be:
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1 Add the contents of C to the contents of D. 2 Multiply B with the sum of C and D. 3 Store the result in A.
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This can be a problem for people who have experience with other languages. To avoid this problem when I work with PBASIC, I avoid compound expressions like the one above in the assignment statement above, instead breaking the assignment statement up into its constituent parts and saving any intermediate results in temporary variables.
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This also avoids issues with BASIC compilers that do not have the order of execution limitation that PICBASIC does and avoids differences in application execution if you port the application between the two compilers. The statement above (A = (B * C) + D) could be broken up into the multiple assignment statements listed below:
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Temp = B * C A = Temp + D
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When writing out compound statements like this, make sure that the intermediate values are not stored in the nal destination. Storing intermediate values in the nal destination could cause them to be used by peripheral hardware in the PIC microcontroller, causing invalid operation of the application. PBASIC can access hardware resources directly, but you may wish to use assembly language drivers (which are discussed later in the book). Built-in driver and interface code for PICBASIC as well as all high level languages will tend to be generic. It will either not do exactly what you want or will be all-encompassing, which means the library will take up more space than can be afforded in the application and provide more features than are required. When you are rst starting out, you will probably want to consider using the built-in I/O functions, but as you become more familiar with the PIC microcontroller and its peripheral functions, you will probably prefer to develop your own interfaces that are tailored to the application.
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BASIC87X
As a bit of a lark, I tried my hand at creating a simple BASIC interpreter that provided its own simple user interface that could be accessed via RS-232 on an ASCII terminal emulator built into a PC. The resulting program, which I called BASIC87x, was written to run on a PIC16F877(A) with the internal Flash program memory used for storage of both the interpreter (with user interface) as well as the execution code. Later in the book, I will show how a PIC microcontroller can be used as either a stand-alone device or as an application development tool a great way to introduce new developers to microcontroller programming and interfacing as well as provide a view into what it was like in the early days of personal computers. This language provided by BASIC87x is an interpreted and standard BASIC with the following characteristics:
Very rudimentary implementation of BASIC. The program memory write function of the PIC16F876/PIC16F877 is used to store
the application code.
Maximum application size is 8,192 7-bit ASCII characters. Eight bit characters (bit 7 set) will be converted to . Tabs will be converted to blanks. Any ASCII control characters (ASCII code less than 0x020 or 32 decimal) other
than BS, TAB, and CR will be ignored.
HIGH LEVEL LANGUAGES
Almost all of the internal features of the PIC16F87x are available to the user. Maximum of 57 7-bit ASCII characters to a line. Rudimentary compression (double characters per instruction location along with
additional black compression) of the program statements to save memory as well as simplify statement parsing. 96 bytes of variable name and variable storage. Reformatting of statements to no spaces between operators, constants, and variables. One space between constants and keywords. The formatting code has a parameter for the number of spaces from the left and has a parameter for the column number for the comment. Controlled serially at comfortable speed for processor USART (1,200 bps at 4 MHz). The interpreter can be expected to run at 600 statements per second average when simulated on a 4 MHz PIC microcontroller. The actual application speed will vary according to the amount of Flash accesses and serial I/O operations performed. All application source text (not comments) will be in uppercase to simplify label comparison operations. Arithmetic statements are simple one or two parameter operations. Multiple statements can be put on a single line, separated by a single colon (:) character. Statements cannot be extended past the next line. If there is an application already present in program memory, it will start after a 10 second countdown in which a serial Ctrl-C halts the operation and initiates the user interface. During operation, input keystrokes will be buffered and passed to the application via the INPUT statement. Ctrl-C can be used at any time to stop application execution, but will only be invoked at the end of the current line.
Unlike early versions of BASIC, BASIC87x is not line number based. Instead, destinations are speci ed by labels. As well, only simple assignment statements (with a maximum of one arithmetic operation) are allowed. Blank lines (whitespace) are not available; instead a commented line will have to be used to separate code and comments for readability. BASIC87x was written to natively execute 16-bit values, although 8-bit values are available. The language is reasonably complete in terms of data types, both 16- and 8-bit variables can be declared as arrays, and registers can be declared like variables for direct access. Assignment statements use the traditional programming language format of:
Destination = [MonatomicOperator] Parameter1 [Operator Parameter2]
where the destination is a variable (or array element) and the parameters can be either a variable (or array element) or a decimal value. Hexadecimal or binary values are not allowed. Array elements are checked to be within declared boundaries and 0 (zero) is the rst element of an array. The arithmetic operators available in the assignment statement are listed in Table 3.6, and Table 3.7 lists all the statement types available to the application developer.
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