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Microchip is the owner of the following trademarks: PIC, PIC microcontroller, REAL ICE, ICSP, KEELOQ, MPLAB, PICSTART, PRO MATE and PICMASTER. PICC and PICC Lite are owned by HI-TECH Software. microEngineering Labs, Inc. is the owner of PicBasic. Microsoft is the owner of Windows/95, Windows/98, Windows/NT, Windows/2000, and Visual Basic. All other copyrights and trademarks not listed are the property of their respective manufacturers and owners.
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This edition (as well as the rst two) would not have been possible without the generous help of a multitude of people and companies. While my name is on the cover, this book wouldn t have been possible without their efforts and suggestions the list of people that I feel I must recognize grows substantially with each new edition. The rst thank you goes to everyone on MIT s PICList. The two thousand or so individuals subscribed to this list server have made the PIC microcontroller probably the best supported and most interesting chips available in the market today. While I could probably ll several pages of names listing everyone who has answered my questions and made suggestions on how this second edition could be better, I am going to refrain in fear that I will miss someone. This book wouldn t have been possible except for the patience and enthusiasm of my editor at McGraw-Hill, Judy Bass. During the development of this book, I took on a new job and built a new home which made it dif cult for me to focus as much attention as I should have on the book and the manuscript was subsequently very late. Judy was exceedingly understanding and helpful in getting this book on track and ready for publication. Ben Wirz has been an invaluable resource on this book, helping me to better understand the control of motors and basic robotics concepts; Ben has also been my partner with the TAB Electronics Build Your Own Robot kits and those products as well as this book would not have been possible without all his hard work. I really appreciated his critiques of the materials in the book as well as his suggestions on what the book needed to make it better for everyone. Along with Ben, I would like to thank Don McKenzie, Kalle Pihlajasaari, Mick Gulovsen, John Peatman, and Philippe Techer for your suggestions and ideas. A lot of the projects in this book wouldn t exist without their help, ideas, or the SimmStick. I have never seen a quote pointing out the irony that the greatest opportunity to learn is by teaching others. I want to thank Blair Clarkson of the Ontario Science Centre for his tireless energy in running the OSC/Celestica robot workshops along with his suggestions and ideas for robots and opportunities for the community at large. I would also like to recognize Brad North at Rick Hansen Secondary School in Mississauga, Ontario, and thank him for the opportunity to spend time in the classroom meeting with his students and helping them learn more about electronics, programming, and the PIC microcontroller. In both these situations, I believe I have walked away with a lot more than what I was able to give and I want to thank both of these devoted individuals for the opportunities to work with them. I am pleased to say that Microchip has been behind me every step of the way for this book project. Along with (early) part samples, tool references, and information,
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Copyright 2008, 2002, 1997 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Click here for terms of use.
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I appreciate the fast response to questions and the help with making sure I had the correct information. A big thank you goes out to Fadi Atallah, Andre Nemat, Len Chiella, and Greg Anderson of the local (Toronto) Microchip of ces as well as Carol Popovich, Al Lovrich, Kris Aman, Elizabeth Hancock, and Eric Sells for the time spent on the phone, the many emails, graphics, parts, and suggestions. I know that supporting authors is not in any of their job descriptions and I appreciate the time they were able to devote to me. Along with the efforts of the Microchip employees, I would like to thank Dave Cochran of Pipe-Thompson Technologies who made sure that I always had everything I needed and all my questions were answered. Dave, I also appreciated the lunches at Grazie with you, Len and Greg where not only did we agree on what should be in the book, but also on what to order. Jeff Schmoyer of microEngineering Labs, Inc. was an excellent resource for me to understand how PicBasic worked and was always enthusiastic and helpful for all the questions that I had. PicBasic and the EPIC programmer are outstanding tools that I recommend to both new PIC microcontroller MCU developers and experienced application designers alike. I learned more about compiler operation from Walter Banks of Bytecraft Limited in a few hours of telephone conversations than I did in my two senior years at university. While much of this information came after I had nished this book, the time spent allowed me to go back over the experiments and applications presented in this book with a much better eye toward making the code more ef cient. There are ve other companies that I have grown to rely on an awful lot for creating books as well as doing my own home projects. I recognized two of these companies in the rst edition and I felt I should include three others for their excellent service in the Toronto area. Since writing the rst edition of this book, Digi-Key has continued their excellent customer support and improved upon it with their web pages and overnight home delivery to Canada. AP Circuits are still the best quick turn PCB prototyping house in the business and I recommend that you use them for all your projects. For the rst two editions, I have relied upon M & A Cameras and LightLabs here in Toronto for equipment rentals, photo nishing, and advice. I realize that M & A also rent equipment to the professional photographers in movie industry, but they have always taken the time to answer my questions and help me become a better photographer. LightLabs has always done their level best to ensure the poor pictures I have taken come out as clear and scanner ready as possible. I know I can still do a lot better, but both these companies have done a lot to hide my mistakes. Lastly, I want to thank the people at Supremetronic on Queen Street in Toronto for their unbelievably well stocked shelves of all the little stuff that I need for developing circuits and applications along with the time spent helping me nd (and count) the parts that I have needed. Professionally, I have been blessed with remarkable places to work, develop, and learn. I started out in IBM, which was then spun off into Celestica and now I am proud to be working for Logitech in the Harmony Remote Control Business Unit. In each of these companies, I have been amazed at the diverse and rich talent that these
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