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8 Bit Variable 16 Bit Variable 32 Bit Variable
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After each variable declaration, a counter initialized to the starting address (the parameter of the CBLOCK statement) is incremented by the number of bytes of the variables. For the example above, i is at address 0x020, j is at address 0x021, and k is at address 0x023. Accessing multibyte variables is accomplished by creating small structures using the CBLOCK directive and using the offsets of the structure elements to access the different bytes of the variable like this:
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CBLOCK 0 LowByte HighByte ENDC ; ; ; Structure to De ne a 16 Bit Number Least Signi cant 8 Bits Most Signi cant 8 bits
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Using the structure, the 16-bit variable j can be accessed like this:
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movlw movwf movlw movwf High 1234 HighByte + j LOW 1234 LowByte + j ; ; ; Load j with Decimal 4660 High Byte Loaded with 0x012 Low Byte Loaded with 0x034
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LOW always returns the least signi cant byte of the constant, HIGH returns the second least signi cant byte of the constant, and UPPER returns the most signi cant byte. For variables larger than 16-bit, HIGH and UPPER can be a problem because they do not limit the returned value to 8 bits. Instead, I use the assembler calculator, as in the example below, to load the 4 bytes of k (with the offsets speci ed by byte#) with a 32-bit constant:
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movlw movwf movlw movwf movlw movwf movlw movwf LOW 0x012345678 k + byte0 (0x012345678 >> 8) k + byte1 (0x012345678 >> 16) k + byte2 (0x012345678 >> 24) k + byte3 ; ; & ; & ; & ; Load Load 0xFF Load 0xFF Load 0xFF Load k with the 32 Bit Constant Byte 0 of k with 0x078 Byte 1 of k with 0x056 Byte 2 of k with 0x034 Byte 3 of k with 0x012
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The second way of de ning variables is to de ne their addresses as constants. Constants are text labels that have been assigned a numeric value using the EQU directive and may be referred to as equates. For example, the statement:
PORTB_REG EQU 6 ; De ne a different value
is used to assign the value 6 to the string PORTB_REG. Each time PORTB_REG is encountered in the application code, the MPASM assembler substitutes the string for the constant 6. Constants can be set to immediate values, as shown above, or they can be set to an arithmetic value that is calculated when the assembler encounters the statement. The
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reason for this caveat will be explained below. An example of a constant declaration using an arithmetic statement is shown here:
TRISB_REG EQU PORTB_REG + 0x080
In the second EQU statement, the TRISB register is assigned the offset of the PORTB register plus 0x080 to indicate that it is in Bank 1. I do not recommend using equates for variable de nitions. The CBLOCK directive is somewhat simpler (and requires fewer keystrokes) and keeps track of variable addresses for you if you add or delete variables. The address of code can be set explicitly with the org directive. This directive sets the starting location of the assembly programming. Normally, the start of a PIC microcontroller application is given the org 0 statement to ensure that code is placed at the beginning of the application:
include org clrf bsf clrf bcf goto end p16F84.inc 0 PORTB STATUS, RP0 TRISB ^ 80 STATUS, RP0 $
This is not absolutely required for this application as the assembler is reset to zero before it starts executing. It is a good idea to do it, however, to make sure someone reading the code will understand where it begins. For your initial PIC microcontroller applications the only time you will not use the org 0 statement is when you are specifying the address of the PIC microcontroller s interrupt vector (which is at address 0x0004). A typical application that uses interrupts will have initial statements like:
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