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470 ICSP _MCLR 4 ICSPDAT ICSPCLK 13 14 Vss 12
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Figure 3.25 A simple circuit to turn on an LED and make it ash.
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MATERIALS NEEDED TO CREATE THE FLASHING LED CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
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PIC16F684-I/P, 14-pin PIC microcontroller 0.1 uF capacitor, any type 470 ohm, 1/4 watt resistor Any visible light LED Six-pin ICSP connector in AC164110 Breadboard, wiring, three-AA battery clip, 3x AA alkaline batteries
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This last point may seem a bit facetious, but there is a certain amount of seriousness in it. The PIC16F684, like many other PIC microcontroller part numbers, has all the builtin features I needed to allow me to create this simple application very quickly. The only feature it doesn t have that I would have liked to take advantage of is the ICD hardware to let me single-step through the application. The high level operation of the program is quite simple and could be blocked out as:
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1 Turn off the comparators. 2 Turn off the ADC inputs. 3 Set RC0 as an output.
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Figure 3.26 The prototype LED- ashing circuit built on a breadboard.
MICROCHIP MPLAB IDE
4 Delay some period of time. 5 Toggle RC0 s state. 6 Go to step 4.
The need to turn off the comparators and the ADC inputs was found by reading through the datasheet and looking at the initial power-up state of the chip. I recommend reading through the datasheet rst because chances are a part like this in which the I/O pins can perform multiple functions will not power up in the state you expect. As a rule of thumb, if you see ADC inputs on a PIC microcontroller pin, the part will start up with these pins de ned as analog inputs and you will have to turn off this function to allow them to operate as digital I/O. To program the PIC microcontroller, I used the MPLAB ICD 2 and the AC164110 ICD 2 to ISCP adapter with the six-pin connector that comes with the AC164110 kit. This avoided the need for me to remove the PIC microcontroller chip to program it when I was debugging the application code or testing out new parameters. I highly recommend that you look for cases in which you can leave the PIC microcontroller in circuit while you program it this is much more convenient than removing the microcontroller, putting it into a programmer socket, and then reinserting it again into the application circuit. It is also much easier on the part itself and less likely to result in bent pins, which will render the chip useless. I used a very small breadboard for the circuit, to which I attached, using the breadboard s two-sided tape, a three-AA battery clip. This is a very convenient way of combining the breadboard with its power supply to allow it to be moved and stored easily and safely.
PICC-Lite Flashing LED Once I had the circuit built, I created the following C pro-
gram for the HI-TECH Software PICC-Lite compiler:
#include <pic.h> /* cFlash.c - Simple C Program to Flash an LED on a PIC16F684
RC0 - LED Negative Connection myke predko 07.04.01 */ __CONFIG(INTIO & WDTDIS & PWRTEN & MCLRDIS & UNPROTECT \ & UNPROTECT & BORDIS & IESODIS & FCMDIS);
int i, j; main() {
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PORTC = 0; CMCON0 = 7; ANSEL = 0; TRISC0 = 0;
// // //
Turn off Comparators Turn off ADC Make RC0 Output
while(1 == 1) // Loop Forever { for (i = 0; i < 255; i++) // Simple 500ms Delay for (j = 0; j < 32; j++); RC0 ^= 1; // elihw End C684Flash // Toggle LED
} //
This program can be found in the PICDwnld\C folder and is called C684Flash.c. The MPLAB IDE project was built using the Project Wizard (found in the Project pull-down menu) and consisted of me selecting the PIC16F684, followed by the HI-TECH Software PICC-Lite compiler and then the C684Flash.c program. When I had created the project, I then tried building the code followed by programming the part. When I speci ed how the MPLAB ICD 2 was to operate in circuit, I speci ed that the PIC microcontroller should have its own power supply as you can see above, I speci ed three AA alkaline batteries, which produced 4.5 volts for programming the chip. When I attempted to program the part, I received an error message indicating that the 4.5 volts was not enough (5.0 volts were required) to program the part. In response to this, I disconnected the power to the breadboard and selected the MPLAB ICD 2 programming power option and the programming proceeded without any problems. It was interesting to see the program work with the MPLAB ICD 2 still connected. The debugger hardware provides more than enough current to drive the PIC microcontroller and the LED, and once the programming operation was complete, the MPLAB ICD 2 MCLR# driver was disabled, allowing the application to start running. To test the program, I changed the nal value of j in the second for statement. When I originally wrote the program, I nished the loop when j was 132. To see if reducing this number would speed up the ashing of the LED, I changed it to 32, the value that you see in the source code above. I would recommend that you attempt this type of change when you create your rst applications to get an idea of exactly how they work and how the code operates in the PIC microcontroller.
Assembler Flashing LED Once I had the PICC-Lite program running on circuit, I created PIC684Flash.asm, which can be found in the PICDwnld\Assmblr\PIC684Flash folder: title ; ; asmFlash - PIC16F684 Flashing LED
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