.net barcode scanner sdk a general introduction to the Propeller chip in Software

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chapter 1
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a general introduction to the Propeller chip
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The Propeller Manual 3 Parallax, Inc. 5 Overall System Description 5 The Propeller Tool 7 Instruments Needed to Support Your Experiments
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chapter 2
Making Quick Response Code In Visual Basic .NET
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the Propeller chip: an overall description
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Basic Propeller Specifications 10 Voltage and Amperage Requirements 10 The Operation of the Eight Cogs 10 The Cogs 11 The Hub 12 Forty Pins Total, 32 Pins I/O 12 Connecting to the Propeller 13 The System Counter 14 Program Storage and Execution 14 Objects, Methods, and Other Definitions 15
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chapter 3
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the hardware Setup
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Setting Up the Hardware 21 A Fundamental Reality We Have to Consider
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chapter 4
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Software Setup: the Propeller tool environment
Classroom Analogy 27 Getting Ready to Use the Propeller 28 Installing the Software 28 Our First Program 29 The Typical Spin Program 32 Program Structure 34 General Pin Assignments Used in the Book Propeller FAQ* 38
chapter 5
the Various Propeller memories
Assigning Memory for a New Cog 45 A New Cog Can Be Started to Run a Private or Public Method
Viii
contentS
chapter 6 the how and why of Shared memory
Memory Usage Variable Validity Loops 50 48 49
chapter 7
understanding one cog
Static Versus Dynamic 53 One Cog 55 Counters 58 Counter: General Description 59 Assignment of the 32 Bits in Each of the Counters Using Counter A for PWM Generation 60
chapter 8
the eight cogs
The Cogs 65 The Flags 66 Special Memory Locations The System Clock 66 Programming 67 The ROM 67
chapter 9
Special terms and ideas
70 71
The Hardware 69 The Software 70 New Hardware-Related Definitions New Software-Related Definitions
chapter 10
the Spin language
CON 77 VAR 77 OBJ 78 PUB or PRI 78 Creating a Program with Two Cogs
chapter 11
tasks Suited to Parallel Processing
Parallel Programming Examples Summary 87
Part ii input and output: the Basic techniques to Be mastered learning by doing
chapter 12 chapter 13 general discussion of input/output Binary Pulsing
91 95 101 109
chapter 14 Setting up a 16-character-by-2-line liquid crystal display chapter 15 Binary input and output: reading a Switch and turning on an led if the Switch is closed
Discussion 111 The Repeat Command 112
contentS
chapter 16 reading a Potentiometer: creating an input we can Vary in real time
Analog Inputs 114 Advanced Techniques 118
chapter 17
creating and reading Frequencies
Creating Audible Frequencies Reading Frequencies 135
chapter 18
reading and creating Pulses
Reading Pulse Widths 139 Determining the Pulse Width Pulse Width Creation 146
Part iii the Projects: using what was learned to Build the Projects
chapter 19 Seven-Segment displays: displaying numbers with Seven-Segment led displays chapter 20 the metronomes
151 159 163
chapter 21 understanding a 16-character-by-2-line lcd display
8-Bit Mode 164 Sophisticated Total LCD Control 4-Bit Mode 182 171
chapter 22
running motors: a Preliminary discussion
R/C Hobby Servomotors 190 Stepper Motors (Bipolar) 190 Small Brush-Type DC Motors 191 DC Motors with Attached Encoders 191 Relays and Solenoids 191 Small A/C Motors at 120 Volts, Single Phase 192 Understanding the Concept of the Response Characteristics of a Motor 192 So What Does Compliance Mean 192 DC Motor Operation Notes 193
chapter 23
motor amplifiers for Small motors
Amplifier Construction Notes (for Homemade Amplifiers) 197 Detailed Use Information for the Xavien Two-Axis Amplifier 198 Detailed Use Information for the Solarbotics Two-Axis Amplifier 199
chapter 24 chapter 25
controlling r/c hobby Servos
203 211
Servo Control
controlling a Small dc motor
The Software
contentS
chapter 26 running a Stepper motor: Bipolar, Four-wire motors
Stepper Motor Power and Speed 226 Details on Bipolar Motors 226 Running the Motor 227 Programming Considerations 229 The Software 231
chapter 27
gravity Sensor Based auto-leveling table
Sensor Specifications Discussion 248
chapter 28 running dc motors with attached incremental encoders
Not about Motors 258 Discussion 258 DC Servo Motors with Encoders 261 Processor Connections 262 The Goal 262 PID Control in Greater Detail 263 Holding the Motor Position 265 Ramping 294 R/C Signal Use 305 Some Advanced Considerations You Should Be Aware Of
chapter 29 running Small ac motors: controlling inductive loads
Part iV appendixes
appendix a appendix B appendix c appendix d lcdroutines4 and utilities object listings materials turning cogs on and off experiments Board
317 327 329 331 335
appendix e debugging
Debugging and Troubleshooting 335 Dumb Terminal Program 337 Signal Injection Techniques 337 Notes on Solderless Breadboards 338 Debugging at the More Practical Level 339 Writing a Rudimentary Program for Testing the LCD Another List of Simple Checks 341
epilogue index
343 345
PreFace
After I finished my book Running Small Motors with PIC Microcontrollers, I asked my friend David H. at HVW Technologies in Canada if he had in any ideas as to what might be worth covering in my next book. David suggested that a book about the new Propeller chip from Parallax, written in the same vein as my other hands-on books, could be a welcome effort. With this in mind, I contacted Parallax, Inc., in California and they turned me over to Ms. Stephanie Lindsay, their contact person for authors. Ms. Lindsay was good enough to send me a comprehensive authoring package to get me started on this adventure. In this book I share what I have learned about the Propeller chip and parallel processing with you. It is my wish that by the time you have read through it and have done all the experiments, you will have the confidence, skills, and knowledge necessary to start using the Propeller chip in ways that will make your life both more interesting and, hopefully, more productive. My first reaction to opening the authors package and starting on the Propeller manual was, How am I ever going to learn to use this processor The material was not beginner friendly. Although it was at a higher level, it was very interesting. The further I got into reading and understanding the manual, the more fascinated I became with what the very clever engineers at Parallax had created. It is certainly one of the wonders of the modern world that you can buy eight 32-bit processors and shared memory for less than $8. In this book we will discover what all this, including parallel processing, means to us as engineers, technicians, and hobbyists. As always, I will minimize the use of complicated formulas and jargon so that if you are interested in things mechanical and electronic and have a rudimentary knowledge of what a computer program is, you will be able to use these processors to undertake simple tasks and maybe even some fairly complicated projects in a parallel-processing environment. There are, of course, two aspects to learning how to use the Propeller chip. The first is learning how to use each of the identical 32-bit processors in the chip. Parallax calls each of these eight processors a cog, and each of these cogs is similar to a typical 32-bit processor, with some special features added and some left off. The second is learning how to make these eight cogs interact with one another in an effective way to explore the fascinating parallel-processing possibilities that are now suddenly within our reach. Because the eight 32-bit processors on the chip are identical, once you have learned to use one of them, you have learned to use all of them. The intellectual discipline that has to be mastered involves setting up the problem in such a way that the eight processors can be used in the most effective way possible, thus creating a viable solution for the task you have in mind. This has to do with
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