.net barcode scanner sdk Note All Parallax material photographs carry Parallax copyrights and are used by permission. in Software

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Note All Parallax material photographs carry Parallax copyrights and are used by permission.
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Courtesy of Parallax Inc. Figure 3-1 Propeller Educational Kit.
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Courtesy of Parallax Inc. The Propeller Professional Development Board.
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The PE Kit, with a few additions, will be adequate for all the experiments we will be conducting for this book. If, however, you have plans to work with the Propeller system over an extended period of time, an investment in the Propeller Professional Development Board (PPDB) offered by Parallax is worth considering. This flexible board provides a lot of accessories around its perimeter and will save you a lot of time and money over the long haul. I have provided a photograph of the board for your review in Figure 3-2. If, on the other hand, you are a software person and all you want to do is some software experimentation and development and you will not be adding a lot of hardware, the Propeller Demo Board may be the best investment for you. It has the interfaces you need for a keyboard, a monitor, a mouse, and much more. It is ready to use (see Figure 3-3). The Propeller chip itself is available in three form factors. They are illustrated in Figure 3-4.
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Set the PE Kit up exactly as suggested by Parallax. This will allow you to conduct all the more advanced experiments that Parallax offers as a part of their educational program and the more simplified beginner s experiments we will be undertaking as a part of the beginner s learning experience in this book. The experiments created by Parallax are more formal and in many ways more suited to a first course about the Propeller at a junior college or a university.
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Courtesy of Parallax Inc. The Propeller Demo Board.
The experiments I have designed are more for the amateur engineer, the technician, or the hobbyist. I will not go into the scientific basis for the experiments, except at the most rudimentary level, so that we can proceed more with the use of what we are creating as opposed to the formal understanding of the science behind what we are creating. (In this I do not mean to set aside the value of the fundamental scientific understanding of all natural phenomena but rather I am committing to keep things simple as suitable for the absolute beginner. I urge you to understand what we are doing in the most fundamental scientific way possible. Many books are devoted to just that.)
Courtesy of Parallax Inc. Figure 3-4 The three Propeller P8X32A form factors.
a FuNdameNTal realiTy we have To CoNSider
A Fundamental Reality We Have to Consider
The Propeller chip is designed to be a device that uses very little power. It runs at 3.3 VDC and is designed to operate at lower frequencies that require much less power. These features make the chip very desirable for thousands of portable applications that demand a very low power drain, but it causes some special problems for us experimenters. Among these, the one we need to address first is that a lot of the devices we will be interacting with will be operating not at 3.3 VDC but at 5 VDC and will be using TTL-level logic. The CMOS circuitry in the Propeller will switch the TTL signal without difficulty, but because we have a very limited amount of power available directly from the chip to power all the 32 I/O lines, we have to buffer the outputs from the Propeller to amplify the signals we need. (The high impedance inputs need very little power to switch them high and low, but the outputs will have to be amplified for many of the uses we have in mind.) Buffering the outputs also protects the Propeller in the case of wiring mistakes that may introduce high voltages and currents to the buffered pins. (If we do not buffer the outputs, we will be limited to loading only three or four lines that are not going to high-impedance devices.) Let s make the reasonable assumption that for most of the experiments we undertake in this book, we will need no more than 24 lines of I/O. Of these, we will need seven lines for the 16-character-by-2-line LCD (liquid crystal display) we use as the display for all our experiments. This leaves 17 bits for other interactions. As a general rule, most applications need two inputs for every output they support, so we will need to set the balance of the 17 bits as 6 bits of output and 11 bits of input. This means we will need to provide one 7404 hex buffer for the 6 output bits. Using three 7404s would allow us to have up to 18 fully loadable outputs. The circuitry within each 7404 is shown symbolically in Figure 3-5. (A buffered line can usually drive about 10 TTL level loads.) The 7404 hex inverter is a 14-pin device, and each one can buffer six lines. The lines are inverted as a part of the buffering process, meaning that a low is turned into a high and a high is output as a low as it goes through the buffer. For our purposes, this can be handled in the software by defining a high as 0 and a low as 1 when the constants are defined at the top of the program. Some of the high load outputs from the Propeller will be routed through a 7404 buffer. We do not need to limit the power needed by each input because the high input impedance of the Propeller inputs requires very little power. We would need a total of three 7404s buffers for all the lines we might need to use as outputs, but in this book we will never need more than one. The lines to the 16 2 LCD we will be using have very high impedances and therefore do Figure 3-5 Pinouts not need to go through buffers. The use of a buffer to for the six inverters in a 7404 IC power and LED is shown in Figure 3-6.
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