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Figure 3-6 Using one of the buffers in a 7404 to power an LED.
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In my experiments, I used the Propeller chip to turn an LED on and off (directly without a buffer) and through various resistors and then through a 7404 buffer. In doing this, I was experimenting with various conditions under which the Propeller is likely to operate. I found that even with a 1 meg resistor in line with the buffer, the LED switched without difficulty. On the other hand, no resistor is needed to manage the input line currents because the input impedances are so extremely high already. My experiments indicated that any value of 0 to 1 meg ohms would work with the 7404 I was testing. Running mini experiments like this makes you comfortable with the operation of the devices you use every day. You will find that the inputs to the 7404 (and other similar gates) have a very high impedance so that even a direct connection will work, but that we can add a 1 meg resistor in line to make sure the load on the Propeller will be minimal, if by mistake we manage to a create a dangerous voltage at the gate input while we are setting it up. Once we get everything working the way we want it, we can remove the resistors. The program for blinking an LED shown in Figure 3-6 is the first program covered in 4, which is devoted to the programming environment for the Propeller chip.
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Software Setup: the propeller tool environment
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note In this and all other discussions, it is assumed that you have access to the Propeller Manual.
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All the programs in this book are written in the Spin language, and all programming is done in a programming environment called the Propeller Tool. This program is provided free of charge by Parallax and is available for downloading from www .Parallax.com/Propeller. The Propeller Tool environment is a full-screen editor that allows Propeller programming in two languages. The first, the Spin language, is a higher-level language that will be used for writing all the programs in this book. The other language is called Propeller Assembly and consists of a comprehensive set of Assembly language instructions. All Assembly language routines must be included as DAT blocks within a Spin language program; they cannot be called as standalone methods or objects. We will not use the Assembly language. Although the Spin language seems daunting at first sight, it is really a fairly easyto-use language that beginners should find easy to learn after a few examples. There is really nothing intimidating about the language. The only difficult part is getting used to the rigid indenting required by the language for the proper formation of programming blocks. (See examples in the Propeller Manual.) This chapter introduces you to this programming environment. Extensive programming examples in the second and third parts of the book provide further examples as you get more familiar with the system. All the programs we develop in this resource are written exclusively in the Spin language. The Spin language is an object-based language. It employs a formatting requirement that makes it a lot easier to use and makes it more powerful than it seems to be at first sight. If you have problems with your first programs, the most probable
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Software Setup: the propeller tool environment
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cause will be improper indenting. My first reaction to using the system was that it seemed more tedious than it needed to be, but then I realized it was a useful and well-thought-out way of doing what needed to be done. The Propeller Manual provides detailed instructions on how to use the language in the Propeller Tool environment and, of course, detailed descriptions for each of the commands. The examples given are often a little bit more sophisticated than what might be understood by an absolute beginner, and in this resource I endeavor to provide simpler examples and skip over the more advanced techniques that you find in the manual itself. My goal is to get you introduced to the system fundamentals. Once you understand the fundamentals, it will be your job to gain the proficiency you need to get your day-to-day work done. The Propeller Manual provides no information on programming. It assumes that you are familiar with standard programming techniques, and as a matter of fact you need to understand standard computer programming techniques fairly well in order to use the Propeller Manual effectively. As we develop the programs in this book, we use simple programming techniques that are easy to understand, even for the absolute beginning user. Keeping in mind that this is a resource for the beginner, we will concentrate on the simpler, more basic techniques that need to be mastered to be able to use the parallel-processing capabilities of the Propeller system effectively. Understanding the parallel-processing environment as implemented within the Spin language is fundamental to understanding how to use this Propeller chip. This is a new hardware environment. The basic concept that you must understand is that no matter how much hardware there is, if the software does not address the hardware features, you cannot use them. And no matter how powerful the software is, if there is no hardware to be addressed by it, the power is useless. Hardware and software must work together, and understanding how the interaction is implemented is the key to understanding how best to use any system. Because parallel processing is new to you and everything we do will be done in the Spin language, understanding the tools offered by the Spin language is critical. We need to understand how the hardware and software support one another to provide a viable environment within this system. Parallel processing needs a number of features that we are not yet familiar with. These features make the parallel-processing process possible. One example we will consider almost immediately is the need to provide a way to send up to eight separate subprograms to the Propeller s eight cogs within one program. The Spin language provides the tools needed to do this, but we don t yet understand how to use these tools. (Each cog can undertake more than one task within the subprogram assigned to it.) In order to understand how the Propeller and its parallel-processing environment are to be used, we first need to understand a few basic concepts associated with parallel processing. The concepts themselves are not particularly alien to understanding single-thread linear programming in that each of the eight cogs is pretty much a standard linear program processor with some features added and some other features left out. The new concept that needs to be understood is that the program we write has to have some way of deciding which cog is going to do what and when so that a coherent
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