.net barcode scanner sdk Software Setup: the propeller tool environment in Software

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Software Setup: the propeller tool environment
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A more extensive use of the commands is developed in the programs in the second and third parts of this book. The programs are devoted exclusively to the development of techniques that do real work in the real world. Once you get comfortable with the general layout of a Spin program, you can start adding more sophisticated and complicated commands to your programs. The basic goal is to get comfortable with the Spin language and how it works. Adding little complications as you get better at programming in Spin is relatively easy once you start writing programs that work.
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Program Structure
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What does a Spin program look like, and where do we put what to make it work right First, let s look at a couple diagrams to see what a linear program looks like as compared to a program set up for a parallel environment. Figure 4-3 shows a schematic for a typical linear program. Notice that there is only one main loop. Figure 4-4, on the other hand, shows what the layout for a parallel programming schematic might look like. Notice that a number of independent programs share a common memory bank. The only interaction between the programs is through the shared memory. This is the hallmark of the parallel programming environment provided by the Propeller system.
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note Each processor has its own loop, but they all use the shared memory.
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The difference is readily apparent, so next let s look at what a simple Spin program looks like as actual program code. (No parallel processing yet.)
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figure 4-3 Linear program schematic
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figure 4-4 Parallel program schematic
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program StruCture
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figure 4-5 Code descriptions for the program to blink an LED
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Figure 4-5 shows the code for blinking an LED, as was done in Program 4-1 earlier, with comments to explain what goes where within the object. You should also be looking at the entire code for this object (shown earlier) to see what the commenting for each line looks like and states. All objects that use only one cog are expansions of this object. The methods called are part of the object in the same cog. No methods are called from an external object in this example. When stack space has to be assigned for another cog that will execute Spin code, the spaces are declared on top of the program in the VAR section, as shown in Figure 4-6.
figure 4-6
Assigning space for a new cog
Software Setup: the propeller tool environment
This figure contains a number of new concepts that need to be explained before you look at the code:
Global variables
PulsWidth is a global variable defined in the VAR block. It is available to all the cogs. Local variables Cycle_time and period are local variables that are used within the MoveMotor method only and are not available to other methods or to other cogs. Parameter passing Pin is a parameter that is passed to the MoveMotor cog when it is started. Figure 4-6 shows where all the variables go for a program that uses two cogs. The main cog in the program does not show any actual code. It just shows how the main program assigns space and then starts a cog to run the MoveMotor method. The space is assigned under VAR as 25 longs at the location Stack.
General Pin Assignments Used in the Book
In general, the 40 pins on the Propeller will be given the assignments outlined in Table 4-1. If this scheme is followed, some items can be left attached at all times and others that must be relocated have to be moved only occasionally. The information in this table forewarns you about what pins might be needed for our experiments so that you can assign the pins you want to use accordingly. In this table, I = input and O = output for the data flow directions.
table 4-1 pin alloCationS for the propeller Chip aS uSed in thiS book
Pin P0 P1 P2 P3 P4 P5 P6 P7 P8 P9
UsAgE As needed. As needed. As needed. As needed. As needed. As needed. As needed. As needed. As needed. As needed.
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