.net barcode scanner sdk The Hardware in Software

Paint QR in Software The Hardware

The Hardware
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The hardware is already set to be used as a parallel environment, with eight cogs, 32 input/output lines, and shared memory. This is set in concrete. Nothing that we can change is available to us on the hardware side. What we do have available to us is the
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Special TermS and ideaS
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freedom to use the hardware as we see fit. Although this may seem trivial at first, as we will see, it is not. There are intelligent ways to use the hardware and there is much room for foolishness.
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The Software
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The software introduces us to some new concepts and constructions to allow us to play in a parallel environment; therefore, understanding the software is the key. It s not just understanding what each instruction does; it is understanding what the motivation is behind designing the software the way it was designed so that our efforts are not contrary to the way the system is intended to be used. In other words, we do not want to row upstream. Even so, each programmer will have his or her own way of doing things. Each project undertaken has to provide a satisfactory solution, and there are many ways to get the job accomplished. The fact that we have eight processors at our disposal makes for many, many interesting possibilities. As we look closely at the system, we will see that some of the realities are forced upon us by the features selected by the hardware designers and some by the choices made for us by the designers of the software. Because this was all decided some time ago, we have no say in the matter. We have to work within what has been provided to us. Here are two basic concepts that need to be understood:
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If a certain item of hardware does not exist, there is neither a need nor a way to
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address it. It needs no software support.
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If we have some great piece of hardware and the software to address it does not
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exist, there is no way to give the hardware the instructions needed to manipulate its properties. We can only ignore the hardware. In other words, if there are only 32 I/O lines on the processor, no amount of software sophistication will allow us to turn I/O line 33 on or off, and if the hardware has 33 input/output lines and the software allows us to address only 32 of them, the 33rd line is useless for all practical purposes. In philosophical terms, we say that we cannot discuss those things for which there are no words. First, the words need to be invented and defined. The Spin language does this for us to allow us to proceed with programming. That is what the instruction set of every language does.
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New Hardware-Related Definitions
On the hardware side, the new definitions are as follows:
Cog
A cog is an independent 32-bit RISC-like processor that resides within the Propeller chip. The program that the cog executes is downloaded into Cog_0, along with all other program instructions. The interpreter is transferred from main ROM
new SofTware-relaTed definiTionS
to the cog when each cog is opened. An area of memory has to be assigned to every cog except Cog_0 in the main memory for its program space. Cogs are given access to shared resources, one after another, in a round-robin fashion by the hub. Hub The hub is the central monitoring device that controls which cog gets to do what and when. It allows access to the shared system resources by each cog, one at a time, in a round-robin fashion. It manages all ancillary functions for the cogs. Each cog is assigned the same amount of time during its turn to access the mutually exclusive resources. Shared memory This is the internal memory (to the Propeller) that all the cogs can access when it is their turn to control the system. It is the hub RAM. All the variables declared in the VAR section of the program are stored in the shared memory, regardless of whether more than one cog addresses them. The shared memory is not to be confused with the external memory that the program is read from on startup if no PC is attached to the Propeller system. The external memory is not accessed by any cog directly, although it does download to the Cog_0 memory space on initial startup and is loaded through Cog_0. System clock Like all system clocks, the Propeller system clock times all internal operations. There is only one system clock, and it is shared by and accessible to all the cogs. Its speed is programmable. Round-robin This refers to the serial access the hub provides for all exclusive resources to each of the cogs in the system. Each cog gets the same amount of time as every other cog. Turning off a cog saves energy but does not save time. In other words, turning off a cog does not speed the system up. External memory This is the one-wire memory that is external to the Propeller chip. This memory contains the program the Propeller will execute if it is not connected to a computer on startup. This means you cannot have a free-standing device if it does not have external memory as a part of the Propeller s peripherals.
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