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CReaTing a pRogRam wiTh Two CogS
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Creating a Program with Two Cogs
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Figure 10-4 shows the placement of the various components you need to start a second cog in your system. All other cogs are to be started in this way.
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note Cog_two will allow us to implement the use of a 16 2 LCD display.
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Figure 10-4 Wiring for one LED as programmed in Program 10-1
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Tasks suiTed To Parallel Processing
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Everything (except the most rudimentary tasks) can be handled in a parallel-processing environment. Of course, many tasks are best not handled in this environment. An illustrative example is the display of all the numbers from 1 to 1,000. We could assign this to three processors: one to create all the odd numbers, one to create all the even numbers, and a third to display them all on the computer screen. Obviously, this is not the most intelligent way of getting this job done. Like many other tasks, this task is easily handled by one processor, and that is how we would normally handle it even in a Propeller environment. Essentially, this task is too simple to need a parallel environment. A parallel environment works best when a number of tasks need to be undertaken simultaneously to complete the job at hand. Complicated-but-not-too-complicated tasks are best picked as our first examples. These and similar examples will be followed up in Part III of the book with full-fledged programming implementations.
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sTePPer MoTor
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Running a bipolar stepper motor is a good target for parallel programming. The running of bipolar stepper motors is covered in detail in Part III of this book in 26, and you may want to refer there before you continue reading here. At the least, you should know how a stepper motor works so that what we consider here makes sense to you. Here, we will confine ourselves to the general discussion of the parallel tasks we need to undertake to run the motor.
Tasks suiTed To Parallel Processing
To run a stepper motor, we need to undertake the following tasks:
Determine the sequencing requirements for the motor coils. Read a potentiometer that we will use to set the speed of the motor. Manage the power to the amplifiers for the two motor coils. Manage the LCD to display information of interest to us as we run the motor.
Because we are working in a parallel environment, each of these tasks can be assigned to a cog.
dc MoTor sPeed conTrol
Controlling the speed of a DC motor with a potentiometer often requires the reading of the potentiometer or some other input device and modulating the power to the motor so that the encoder counts read reflect the desired motor response. In such a situation, a parallel-processing arrangement can be used to our advantage. With the setup we will be using for our experiments, the cogs can be assigned as follows:
Read the potentiometer that will control the speed. Create the PWM signal needed to power the motor. Read the encoder repeatedly to get speed feedback. Display the results of the experiment on the LCD.
Hobby servo (r/c)
In a hobby servo, the control requirement is to send the servo a pulsed signal every 1/60th of a second. The timing of the pulses is not critical, but the length of the pulses is. They have to be 1,520 microseconds 750 microseconds long. As usual, we will use the input from a potentiometer to control the length of the pulses. Each critical task will be assigned to a separate cog. With the setup we will be using for our experiments, the cogs can be assigned as follows:
Read the potentiometer that will control the pulse width. Create the pulse width needed to position the motor. Send the pulses to the motor at the required times. Display the results of the experiment on the LCD.
There are many variations of this control scheme. One obvious possibility is to write the code so that the servo output is a 90-degree quadrant instead of a 180-degree move. In most applications of these servos, the middle 90 degrees of the move is the most useful. It would also be possible to read a second potentiometer and use its value as a trim factor.
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