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Voltage and Amperage Requirements
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The current draw of the device varies with the temperature, the operating frequency, and with the number of cogs active at any one time. For general design purposes, a requirement of half an amp at 3.3 VDC can be used for the power supply. More power is used if more cogs are active, and more power is used if more of the I/O is in use. More power is necessary if the processor is being run at higher frequencies because the higher frequencies needed more power to maintain operations. Most of the work done in this book will be done with a 5 MHz external crystal and 2 multiplier for 10 MHz operation.
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The Operation of the Eight Cogs
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The eight cogs in the processor run independently and simultaneously, and are controlled and coordinated by a system counter or clock. From one to eight cogs can be active
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The Cogs
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Figure 2-2 system
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The basic layout of the Propeller
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at any one time. All the cogs have access to all the I/O pins, the system counter, the data bus, and address busses at all times. The various activities within each of the cogs in the system are accessed in an orderly, round-robin fashion as controlled by the hub. The hub does not care how many cogs are running at any one time. It accesses them one at a time in a round-robin fashion. Each hub is accessed for the same amount of time to keep the entire system synchronized with the system counter. When the hub gives a turn to a cog, that cog has exclusive access to the shared resources. The shared resources can be divided into two types of resources: the common resources and the mutually exclusive resources. Each cog has access to the common resources at all times, as mentioned previously, but only one cog, the active cog, has access to the mutually exclusive resources and that s only when it is its turn to be in charge of the system. All this is transparent to beginners, and we do not need to worry about it right now. (When I use the word transparent, I mean that we are not aware of its operation. In other words, we see right through it and are not aware of its presence, like a pane of glass.) The part of the system of immediate interest to us is shown in Figure 2-2. Note that this is a very simplified diagrammatic representation. Refer to the Propeller Manual.
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The Cogs
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As was mentioned previously, there are a total of eight cogs. They are identical in every way except for their identification (as Cog_0 to Cog_7). Cog_0 is the controlling cog, on startup, and as you might expect, at least one cog has to be active at all times. These notes provide you with an introduction to the cogs in a simplified format.
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The ProPeller ChiP: An overAll DesCriPTion
Each of the eight cogs is a fully fledged 32-bit RISC-like processor. The usual interrupt structure and its related functions are not implemented in any form in the Propeller system. They are not needed. Each cog has an independent 2KB of RAM, accessible as 512 32-bit longs. This RAM is used by the cog to store:
The Spin Interpreter, copied over from main ROM, if the cog is executing Spin
code
Program code copied from main RAM, variables, flags, and data, if the cog is
executing Propeller Assembly
Interface locations for other system and peripheral requirements
Certain specific RAM locations in each cog, the special-purpose registers, have been assigned to specific uses to allow interaction with the rest of the system in an orderly manner. These uses are listed in the Propeller Manual.
The Hub
The hub is a hardware device that controls how and when each of the cogs will interact with the various parts of the system. It also controls all the resources needed to maintain the integrity of the system. Because certain timing sequences have to be maintained to allow the system to operate properly, these need to be understood by the programmer so that he or she will design programs that comply with these timing and access requirements. For beginners, there are no special requirements that need to be met. Most of the requirements have to do with critical timing, which will have to be addressed when programming in Assembly language and dealing with timing critical tasks. The timing diagrams for these interactions are illustrated and explained in the Propeller Manual.
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