barcode scanner sdk vb.net Potentiometers Amplifier and motor in Software

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Potentiometers Amplifier and motor
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Controlling a Small DC motor
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Figure 25-2 Wiring diagram for Propeller, potentiometer, and motor amplifier Power supplies LCD LEDs
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The rest is software, so we will address that important aspect of the control next.
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Running the motor in a parallel-processing environment has its own special requirements. We have to decide how to break up the goal of the total effort into various subtasks so that they can be assigned to any number of the eight cogs in a coherent way. In this experiment, we have some essentially independent tasks that are amenable to being assigned to separate cogs. A closer look at the problem reveals that we have the following separable tasks:
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Read the potentiometer that controls speed and direction. Generate the pulses that control the motor speed.
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Display information on the LCD so we can see what is going on. Turn on the two LEDs as indicators.
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One way of addressing these parallel-processing needs is to manage the system so that we have the following arrangement for the cogs:
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Assign one cog to continuously read the potentiometer. Assign one cog to continuously handle the display functions. Assign one cog to determine the three motor parameters: PWM value Direction Braking function
Doing the work in a parallel-processing environment makes it much easier to get the job done because we do not have to worry about managing a complicated interrupt-driven environment. Each of these tasks is straightforward, and we will have no problem undertaking any of them. The hard part was deciding how to divide the work up between the cogs and for this project, even that turned out to be relatively straightforward. A couple of the pieces of the software we need have already been developed. We already know how to read a potentiometer, and we already know how to display information on the LCD. These methods can be called from the LCDRoutines4 and Utilities programs once we have listed these objects under the OBJ block. However, before we get ahead of ourselves, let s start with just getting the motor running. Then we will add all the other features discussed in the preceding paragraphs. We know from the amplifier data that the amplifier is active if we tie the brake line low and make the PWM line high. The direction bit can be either high or low, and the motor will run in one direction or the other. We do, however, have to tie it high or low, because if we let it float, the motor will run back and forth in a random way, depending on the stray static electricity on the line. After we have grounded the brake line, we need to add code for controlling the other lines. This is shown in Program 25-1. The goal here is to connect up the motor and the amplifier in the correct way and then run the program. If the motor runs, it will confirm that everything is on the right track, and we can move on to the next step.
Program 25-1 Minimal Program to Run a Motor Continuously
{{04 Sep 09 Harprit Sandhu RunMotorOnly.spin Propeller Tool Version 1.2.6 25 Program 1 (continued)
Controlling a Small DC motor
Program 25-1
Minimal Program to Run a Motor Continuously (continued)
RUNNING A DC MOTOR. ON CONTROL ONLY TO CONFIRM CONNECTIONS This program runs the motor if turned on Lines on Xavien amp as identified in the diagram are line 1 Brake tie it to ground to turn it off line 2 PWM signal line 6 on Prop line 3 Direction line 7 on Prop Connections are Amplifier brake Amplifier PWM Amplifier direction
P5 P6 P7
}} CON _CLKMODE=XTAL1+ PLL2X _XINFREQ = 5_000_000 BRK = 5 PWM = BRK + 1 DIR = PWM + 1 PUB Go dira[BRK..DIR]~~ outa[BRK..DIR]:=%000 repeat outa[PWM]~~
'The system clock spec 'crystal
'main Cog 'set direction for 3 lines 'make the lines low at start 'turn on the PWM 100%
This program seems to be a bit on the trivial side, but it gives us one very important piece of information. It tells us that the amplifier and motor are hooked up correctly. Now, if we can manipulate the control bits under consideration with more sophistication, we will have a program like what we have in mind. If we get hung up with the software and the motor will not run, or if we think we might have blown everything up, all we have to do is run this program. If the motor runs, chances are things are still okay. At the least, it tells us that the problem is not in the hardware. Next, let s discuss how we read the potentiometer and create the direction bit. We already know how to read a potentiometer (the Utilities object contains the methods we need). We incorporated the ability to read the potentiometer as one of the methods in the Utilities program. This can be done by using the Read3202_0 method as follows:
OBJ UTIL : "Utilities" PRI PotentiometerCount:=UTIL.Read3202_0
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