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The brackets special characters are particularly useful for matching on various suffixes or prefixes for a pattern. For example, suppose you need to match on filenames that begin with the pattern "week" and have several different suffixes, as in week1, week2, and so on. To match on just those files with suffixes 2, 4, and 5, you enclose those characters within brackets. In the next example, notice the pattern week[245] matches on week2 and week4, but not on week1:
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week[245] week2 weather reports on week4 week1 reports
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The brackets special characters are also useful for matching on a pattern that begins in either uppercase or lowercase. Linux distinguishes between uppercase and lowercase characters. The pattern "computer" is different from the pattern "Computer"; "computer" would not match on the version beginning with an uppercase C. To match on both patterns, you need to use the brackets special characters to specify both c and C as possible first characters in the pattern. Place the uppercase and lowercase versions of the same character within brackets at the beginning of the pattern. For example, the pattern [Cc]omputer searches for the pattern "computer" beginning with either an uppercase C or a lowercase c. You can specify a range of characters within the brackets with the dash. Characters are ranged according to the character set being used. In the ASCII character set, lowercase letters are grouped together. Specifying a range with [a-z] selects all the lowercase letters. In the first example, shown next, any lowercase letter will match the pattern. More than one range can be specified by separating the ranges with a comma. The ranges [A-Za-z] select all alphabetic letters, both uppercase and lowercase.
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Although shell file matching characters enable you to match on filenames, regular expressions enable you to match on data within files. Using grep with regular expressions, you can locate files and the lines in them that match a specified pattern. You can use special characters in a grep pattern, making the pattern a regular expression. grep regular expressions use the *, ., and [] special characters, as well as the ^ and $ special characters. Suppose you want to use the long-form output of ls to display just your directories. One way to do this is to generate a list of all directories in the long form and pipe this list to grep, which can then pick out the directory entries. You can do this by using the ^ special character to specify the beginning of a line. Remember, in the long-form output of ls, the first character indicates the file type. A d represents a directory, an l represents a symbolic link, and an a represents a regular file. Using the pattern '^d', grep will match only on those lines beginning with a d.
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$ ls -l | grep '^d' drwxr-x--- 2 chris 512 Feb 10 04:30 drwxr-x--- 2 chris 512 Jan 6 01:20
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If you only want to list those files that have symbolic links, you can use the pattern ^l:
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$ ls -l | grep '^l' lrw-rw-r-- 1 chris group 4 Feb 14 10:30 lunch
Be sure to distinguish between the shell wildcard character and special characters used in the pattern. When you include special characters in your grep pattern, you need to quote the pattern. Notice regular-expression special characters and shell wildcard characters use the same symbols: the asterisk, period, and brackets. If you do not, then any special characters in the pattern will be interpreted by the shell as shell wildcard characters. Without quotes, an asterisk would be used to generate filenames rather than being evaluated by grep to search for repeated characters. Quoting the pattern guarantees that grep will evaluate the special characters as part of a regular expression. In the next example, the asterisk special character is used in the pattern as a regular expression and in the filename list as a shell wildcard character to generate filenames. In this case, all files in the current directory will be searched for patterns with zero or more s's after "report":
$ grep 'reports*' * mydata: The report was sitting on his desk. weather: The weather reports were totally accurate.
The brackets match on either a set of characters, a range of characters, or a nonmatch of those characters. For example, the pattern doc[abc] matches on the patterns "doca", "docb", and "docc", but not on "docd". The same pattern can be specified with a range: doc[a-c]. However, the pattern doc[^ab] will match on any pattern beginning with "doc" but not ending in a or b. Thus, "docc" will be retrieved, but not "doca" or "docb". In the next example, the user finds all lines that reference "doca", "docb", or "docc":
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