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You can invoke several powerful mail clients on the command line that provide a full-screen, cursor-based interface. Menus are displayed on the screen whose entries you can select using your keyboard. Basic cursor movement is supported with arrow keys. Pine and Mutt are both mail clients that provide a screen-based interface. Although screen-based, the mail clients are very powerful. Pine, in particular, has an extensive set of features and options.
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Pine stands for "Program for Internet News and Email." It features full MIME support, enabling you to send messages, documents, and pictures easily. Pine has an extensive list of options, and it has flexible Internet connection capabilities, letting you receive both mail and
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Usenet news. Pine also enables you to maintain an address book where you can place frequently used e-mail addresses. You can find more information about Pine, including documentation and recent versions, from the Pine Information Center Web site at www.washington.edu/pine. The Pine newsgroup is comp.mail.pine, where you can post questions. Pine runs from the command line using a simple cursor-based interface. Enter the pine command to start Pine. Pine supports full-screen cursor controls. It displays a menu whose items you can select by moving the cursor with the arrow keys to the entry of your choice and pressing ENTER. Each item is labeled with a capital letter, which you use to select it. The O command brings up a list of other Pine commands you can use. To send a message, select the Compose Message item. This brings up a screen where you can enter your message. You are first taken through the different entries for the header, which prompts you for an e-mail address and subject. You can even attach files. Then, you type in the text of the message. A set of commands listed at the bottom of the screen specifies different tasks. You can read a file with CTRL-R and cancel the message with CTRL-C. Use CTRL-X to send the message. Pine organizes both sent and received messages into folders that you select using the Folder List entry on the main menu. The different available folders are listed from left to right. Three folders are automatically set up for you: INBOX, sent-mail, and saved-messages. The INBOX folder holds mail you have received but have not yet read. Sent mail is for messages you have sent to others, while saved messages are messages you have read and want to keep. Use the LEFT and RIGHT ARROW keys to select the one you want and then press ENTER. Selecting the INBOX folder will list the messages you have received, as shown in Figure 17-8. Headers for received messages are then displayed, and you can choose a specific header to view your message. The folder you select becomes your default folder. You can return to it by selecting the Folder Index entry in the main menu.
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Figure 17-8: Selecting messages in Pine
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Mutt incorporates many of the features of both Elm and Pine. It has an easy-to-use screenbased interface similar to Elm. Like Pine, Mutt has an extensive set of features, such as MIME support. You can find more information about Mutt from the Mutt Web page at www.mutt.org. Here, you can download recent versions of Mutt and access online manuals and help resources. On most distributions, the Mutt manual is located in the /usr/doc
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directory under Mutt. The Mutt newsgroup is comp.mail.mutt, where you can post queries and discuss recent Mutt developments. Mutt screens have both an index mode and a pager mode. The index mode is used to display and manage message header lists, while the pager mode is used to display and compose messages. Mutt screens support ANSI escape sequences for color coding, displaying commands, prompts, and selected entries in different colors. You invoke Mutt with the command mutt entered on a Linux shell command line. Mutt displays a list of common commands across the top of the screen. Pressing the single key listed before the command executes that command. For example, pressing q quits Mutt, s saves the current message, and r enables you to send a reply to a message. Press the key to obtain a complete listing of Mutt commands. To compose a new message, press m. On the bottom line, you are then sequentially prompted to enter the address of the person to whom you are sending a message, the subject line, and a carbon copy list. Then you are placed in the standard editor, usually Vi or Emacs, and you can use the editor to enter your message. If you are using Vi, you first have to press the a or i command before you can enter text (see 16). After entering your text, you press ESC to return to the Vi command mode. When you finish entering your message, you save and exit Vi with the ZZ command. After editing the message, Mutt displays the header and a list of possible commands at the top of the screen. You can then edit the message or any of the header fields again. With the a command, you can add attachments to the message, and with the q command you can cancel the message. Press the y command to send the message. Headers listing received messages are shown in the main screen upon starting Mutt. You can use the arrow keys to move from one to the next. The selected header is highlighted. Press the ENTER key to display the contents of the message, as shown in Figure 17-9. This opens another screen showing the header fields and the text of the message. Long messages are displayed screen by screen. You can use the PAGE UP or SPACEBAR keys to move to the next screen, and the PAGE DOWN or - keys to move back to the previous screen. The commands for operations you can perform on the message are listed across the top of the screen. With the r command, you can compose and send a reply to the message, while the d command deletes the message. Once you examine your message, you can use the i command to return to the main screen.
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Figure 17-9: Reading Mutt messages Note Another favorite mail client is Elm. Elm has a screen-oriented, user-friendly interface that makes mail tasks easy to execute. However, Elm has been deprecated in Red Hat 7.1 and may be dropped from future releases.
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