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Most newer mail clients are equipped to access mail accounts on remote servers. For such mail clients, you can specify a separate mail account with its own mailbox. For example, if you are using an ISP, most likely you will use that ISP's mail server to receive mail. You will have set up a mail account with a username and password for accessing your mail. Your email address is usually your username and the ISP's domain name. For example, a username of larisa for an ISP domain named mynet.com would have the address larisa@mynet.com. The username would be larisa. The address of the actual mail server could be something like mail.mynet.com. The user larisa would log into the mail.mynet.com server using the username larisa and password to access mail sent to the address larisa@mynet.com. Newer mail clients, such as KMail, Balsa, and Netscape, enable you to set up a mailbox for such an account and access your ISP's mail server to check for and download received mail. You must specify what protocol a mail server uses. This is usually the Post Office Protocol (POP). This procedure is used for any remote mail server. Using a mail server address, you can access your account with your username and password. Instead of creating separate mailboxes in different mail clients, you can arrange to have mail from different accounts sent directly to the inbox maintained by your Linux system for your Linux account. All your mail, whether from other users on your Linux system or from ISP mail servers, will appear in your local inbox. Such a feature is helpful if you are using a mail client, such as Elm or Mail, that does not have the capability to access mail on your ISP's mail server. You can implement such a feature with Fetchmail. Fetchmail checks for mail on remote mail servers and downloads it to your local inbox, where it appears as newly received mail.
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To use Fetchmail, you have to know a remote mail server's Internet address and mail protocol. Most remote mail servers use the POP3 protocol, but others may use the IMAP, ETRM, or POP2 protocols. Enter fetchmail on the command line with the mail server address and any needed options. The mail protocol is indicated with the -p option and the mail server type, usually POP3. If your e-mail username is different from your Linux login name, you use the u option and the e-mail name. Once you execute the fetchmail command, you are prompted for a password. The syntax for the fetchmail command for a POP3 mail server follows:
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fetchmail -p POP3 -u username mail-server
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To use Fetchmail, connect to your ISP and then enter the fetchmail commands with the options and the POP server name on the command line. You will see messages telling you if mail is there and, if so, how many messages are being downloaded. You can then use a mail client to read the messages from your inbox. You can run Fetchmail in daemon mode to have it automatically check for mail. You have to include an option specifying the interval in seconds for checking mail.
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You can specify options such as the server type, username, and password in a .fetchmailrc file in your home directory. You can also have entries for other mail servers and accounts you may have. Instead of entering options directly into the .fetchmailrc file, you can use the fetchmailconf program. fetchmailconf provides a GUI interface for selecting Fetchmail options and entering mail account information. fetchmailconf runs only under X Windows and requires that python and Tk be installed (Red Hat 7.1 does not install fetchmailconf as part of the standard install-you will have to install it manually). It displays windows for adding news servers, configuring a mail server, and configuring a user account on a particular mail server. The expert version displays the same kind of windows, but with many more options. Initially, fetchmailconf displays a window with buttons for choosing a novice or expert version (see Figure 17-10). Choosing the novice version displays a window with an entry labeled "New Server." Type the address of your mail server in the adjoining box and press ENTER. The server address then appears in a list below. To configure that server, click the server name and then the Edit button at the bottom of the window. A new window opens with entries such as user accounts and server protocols. You can add as many user accounts as you may have on that server. You can then further configure an individual account by selecting the username and clicking the Edit button. This opens another window for user account options. You can specify a password and specify any corresponding local users for which you want mail for this account downloaded.
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Figure 17-10: fetchmailconf Once it is configured, you can enter fetchmail with no arguments; it will read entries from your .fetchmailrc file. Accounts you have specified are checked, and any new mail is placed in your inbox. If you want Fetchmail to check automatically for new mail periodically, you can activate its daemon mode. To do so, place a daemon entry in the .fetchmailrc file. The following entry activates the Fetchmail daemon mode, checking for mail every 1,200 seconds:
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