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You can use the finger command to obtain information about other users on your network and the who command to see what users are currently online on your system. The who command lists all users currently connected along with when, how long, and where they logged in. It has several options for specifying the level of detail. who is meant to operate on a local system or network. finger operates on large networks, including the Internet. finger checks to see when a user last logged in, the type of shell that he or she is using, the pathname of the home directory, and whether any mail has been received. finger then checks for a .plan file in a user's home directory that may contain information about the user. The .plan file is a file you create yourself on your own home directory. You can place information you want made publicly available into the .plan file. You can enter the command finger on the command line with the login name of the user you want to check. On the Gnome desktop you can use the gfinger utility to issue finger commands, and in the K Desktop you can use the KDE network utilities (knu). Click the Finger panel and enter the address of the host you want to check. On the K Desktop, the KFinger tool also provides a GUI for easily sending finger queries. It features entries for users and remote servers. You can search for users on specific remote systems.
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With the host command, you can find network address information about a remote system connected to your network. This information usually consists of a system's IP address, domain name address, domain name nicknames, and mail server. This information is obtained from your network's domain name server. For the Internet, this includes all systems you can connect to over the Internet. The host command is an effective way to determine a remote site's IP address or URL. If you have only the IP address of a site, you can use host to find out its domain name. For network
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administration, an IP address can be helpful for making your own domain name entries in your /etc/host file. That way, you needn't rely on a remote domain name server (DNS) for locating a site. On the K Desktop, you can use the KDE network utilities for running host commands. Click the Host resolution panel and enter the address of the host you want to check. On Gnome, you can use the gHostLookup utility.
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$ host www.gnome.org www.gnome.org is a nickname for gnome.labs.redhat.com gnome.labs.redhat.com has address 199.183.24.235 gnome.labs.redhat.com mail is handled (pri=10) by mail.redhat.com $ host 199.183.24.235 235.24.183.199.IN-ADDR.ARPA domain name pointer gnome.labs.redhat.com
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The Gwhois program is a Gnome-based client that displays information about hosts obtained from NIC network services. Gwhois provides an X Windows interface with a list of NIC servers from which to choose. gHostLookup is a simple Gnome application that returns a machine's IP address when you give it the hostname.
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Part V: Red Hat Servers
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22: Server Management 23: FTP Servers 24: Red Hat Web Servers: Apache and Tux 25: Domain Name Service 26: Mail Servers: SMTP, POP, and IMAP 27: News, Proxy, and Search Servers
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22: Server Management
Overview
Reflecting the close relationship between Unix and the development of the Internet, Linux is particularly good at providing Internet services, such as the Web, FTP, and e-mail. In the case of the Web, instead of only accessing other sites, you can set up your own Linux system as a Web site. Other people can then access your system using Web pages you created or download files you provide for them. A system that operates this way is called a server and is known by the service it provides. You can set up your system to be a Web server or an FTP server, connecting it to the Internet and turning it into a site others can access. A single Linux system can provide several different services. Your Linux system can be a Web server and an FTP server, as well as a mail and news server, all at the same time. One user could download files using your FTP services, while another reads your Web pages. All you have to do is install and run the appropriate server software for each service. Each one operates as a continually running daemon looking for requests for its particular services from remote users. A daemon is any program that continually runs, checking for certain requests and performing appropriate actions.
When you install Linux, you have the option of installing several Internet servers, including Web and FTP servers. Linux was designed with Internet servers in mind. For many Linux distributions, a standard install installs these servers automatically and configures them for you (check to make sure the servers are included). Every time you start your system, you also start the Web and FTP server daemons. Then, to turn your Linux system into a Web server, all you have to do is create Web pages. For an FTP server, you only have to place the files you want to make available in the FTP directories. You can operate your Linux system as a server on the Internet or an intranet (local area network), or you can set it up to service only the users on your own system. To operate servers as Internet servers, you must obtain a connection to the Internet and provide access to your system for remote users. Access is usually a matter of enabling anonymous logins to directories reserved for server resources. Linux systems are usually already configured to enable such access for Web and FTP users. Connections to the Internet that can accommodate server activity can be difficult to find. You may need a dedicated connection, or you may need to use a connection set up by an Internet service provider (ISP). You are no longer connecting only yourself to the Internet, but you are allowing many other users to make what could be a great many connections to you through the Internet. This will involve security risks to your system, and precautions should be taken to protect it (see 39). If you only want to provide the services to a local area network (LAN), you don't need a special connection. Also, you can provide these services to users by allowing them to connect over a modem and to log in directly. Users could dial into your system and use your Web pages or use FTP to download files. Furthermore, users with accounts on your own machine can also make use of the servers. In whatever situation you want to use these services, you need the appropriate server software installed and running. This chapter examines how servers are started and stopped on your system, as well as different ways of accessing the servers. Note Linuxconf provides added modules on its Web site that you can use to configure most Internet servers, including the Apache Web server, the BIND domain name server, the Washington University FTP server, and the Sendmail mail server.
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