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On most systems, Apache is installed as a stand-alone server, continually running. As noted in 22, in the discussion of init scripts, your system automatically starts up the Web server daemon, invoking it whenever you start your system. On Red Hat systems, a startup script for the Web server called httpd is in the /etc/rc.d/init.d directory. Symbolic links through which this script is run are located in corresponding runlevel directories. You will usually find the S85httpd link to /etc/rc.d/init.d/httpd in the runlevel 3 and 5 directories, /etc/rc.d/rc3.d and /etc/rc.d/rc5.d. You can use the chkconfig command or the System V Init Editor to set the runlevels at which the httpd server will start, creating links in appropriate runlevel directories. The following command will set up the Web server (httpd) to start up at runlevels 3 and 5 (see 22 for more details on runlevels).
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chkconfig --level 35 httpd on
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You can also use service command to start and stop the httpd server manually. This may be helpful when you are testing or modifying your server. The httpd script with the start option starts the server, the stop option stops it, and restart will restart it. Simply killing the Web process directly is not advisable.
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service httpd restart
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Apache also provides a control tool called apachectl (Apache control) for managing your Web server. With apachectl, you can start, stop, and restart the server from the command line. apachectl takes several arguments: start to start the server, stop to stop it, restart to shut down and restart the server, and graceful to shut down and restart gracefully. In addition, you can use apachectl to check the syntax of your configuration files with the config argument. You can also use apachectl as a system startup file for your server in the /etc/rc.d directory. Remember, httpd is a script that calls the actual httpd daemon. You could call the daemon directly using its full pathname. This daemon has several options. The -d option enables you to specify a directory for the httpd program if it is different from the default directory. With the -f option, you can specify a configuration file different from httpd.conf. The -v option displays the version.
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/usr/sbin/httpd -v
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To check your Web server, start your Web browser and enter the Internet domain name address of your system. For the system turtle.mytrek.com, the user enters http://turtle.mytrek.com. This should display the home page you placed in your Web root directory. A simple way to do this is to use Lynx, the command line Web browser. Start Lynx, and then press g to open a line where you can enter a URL for your own system. Then Lynx displays your Web site's home page. Be sure to place an index.html file in the /var/www/html directory first. Once you have your server running, you can check its performance with the ab benchmarking tool, also provided by Apache. ab shows you how many requests at a time your server can handle. Options include -v, which enables you to control the level of detail displayed, -n, which specifies the number of requests to handle (default is 1), and -t, which specifies a time limit. Note Currently there is no support for running Apache under xinetd. In Apache 2.0, such support is determined by choosing an MPM designed to run on xinetd. Currently there are none.
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Apache Configuration and Directives
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Configuration directives are placed in the httpd.conf configuration file. An documented version of the httpd.conf configuration file for Red Hat is installed automatically in /etc/httpd. It is strongly recommended that you consult this file on your system. It contains detailed documentation and default entries for Apache directives. Any of the directives in the main configuration files can be overridden on a per-directory basis using an .htaccess file located within a directory. Although originally designed only for access directives, the .htaccess file can also hold any resource directives, enabling you to tailor how Web pages are displayed in a particular directory. You can configure access to .htaccess files in the httpd.conf file. Note With Apache version 1.3.4, all configuration directives are placed in one file, the httpd.conf file. Older versions used two other files, the srm.conf and access.conf files. The srm.conf file handled document specifications, configuring file types and locations.
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The access.conf file was designed to hold directives that control access to Web site directories and files. Though you will still find these files on current Apache versions, they will be empty. Apache configuration operations take the form of directives entered into the Apache configuration files. With these directives, you can enter basic configuration information, such as your server name, or perform more complex operations, such as implementing virtual hosts. The design is flexible enough to enable you to define configuration features for particular directories and different virtual hosts. Apache has a variety of different directives performing operations as diverse as controlling directory access, assigning file icon formats, and creating log files. Most directives set values such as DirectoryRoot, which holds the root directory for the server's Web pages, or Port, which holds the port on the system that the server listens on for requests. Table 24-3 provides a listing of the more commonly used Apache directives. The syntax for a simple directive is shown here.
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