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allow-recursion { internals; externals }; // restrict };
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zone "greatgolf.com" { type master; file "greatgolf"; allow-query { any; }; allow-transfer { internals; externals; }; };
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26: Mail Servers: SMTP, POP, and IMAP
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Mail servers provide Internet users with electronic mail services. They have their own TCP/IP protocols such as Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP), the Post Office Protocol (POP), and the Internet Mail Access Protocol (IMAP). Messages are sent across the Internet through mail servers that service local domains. A domain can be seen as a subnet of the larger Internet, with its own server to handle mail messages sent from or received for users on that subnet. When a user mails a message, it is first sent from his or her host system to the mail server. The mail server then sends the message to another mail server on the Internet, the one servicing the subnet on which the recipient user is located. The receiving mail server then sends the message to the recipient's host system. At each stage, a different type of operation takes place using different agents (programs). A mail user agent (MUA) is a mail client program, such as mail or Elm. With a MUA, a user composes a mail message and sends it. Then, a mail transport agent (MTA) transports the messages over the Internet. MTAs are mail servers that use the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) to send messages across the Internet from one mail server to another, transporting them from one subnet to another. On Linux and Unix systems, the commonly used MTA is Sendmail, a mail server daemon that constantly checks for incoming messages from other mail servers and sends outgoing messages to appropriate servers. Incoming messages received by a mail server are then distributed to a user with mail delivery agents (MDAs). Most Linux systems use procmail as their MDA, taking messages received by the mail server and delivering them to user accounts (see www.procmail.org for more information). Most Linux distributions automatically install and configure Sendmail for you. On starting your system, you can send and receive messages between local users using Sendmail. You can also set up your Linux system to run a POP server. POP servers hold user's mail until they log in to access their messages, instead of having mail sent to their hosts directly. Messages sent within a single standalone system require a loopback interface. Most Linux distributions do this automatically for you during the installation process. A loopback interface enables your system to address itself, allowing it to send and receive mail to and from itself. A loopback interface uses the hostname localhost and a special IP address reserved for use by local systems, 127.0.0.1. You can examine your /etc/hosts file to see if your loopback interface has been configured as the localhost. You see "127.0.0.1 localhost" listed as the first entry. If, for some reason, no entry exists for "localhost," you may have to
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create a loopback interface yourself using the ifconfig and route commands as shown here (lo is the term for loopback):
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ifconfig lo 127.0.0.1 route add -net 127.0.0.0
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Received Mail: MX Records
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As noted in 17, a mail address consists of a user name and a host address. The host address takes the form of a fully qualified domain name, listing the host name and the domain name, separated by periods. Most usage of a host name, such as FTP connections, translate the hostname into an IP address and use the IP address to locate the host system. Mail messages operate nearly the same way. However, they make use of the Domain Name Service to determine which host to actually send a message to. The host specified in the mail address may not be the host to which delivery should actually be made. Different networks will often specify a mail server to which mail for the hosts in a network should be delivered. For example, mail addressed to the rabbit.mytrek.com host may actually be delivered to the turtle.mytrek.com host. turtle.mytrek.com may be running a POP mail server that users on rabbit.mytrek.com could access to read their mail. Such mail servers are associated with different hosts by mail exchange records, known as MX records, in a network's DNS configuration (see 25). When mail is received in a network, the network's DNS configuration is first checked for MX records to determine if the mail is to be delivered to a host different from that in the mail message address. For example, the following MX record says that any mail for the rabbit.mytrek.com host is to be delivered to the turtle.mytrek.com host. turtle.mytrek.com is the mail exchanger for rabbit.mytrek.com.
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