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PATH=$PATH:/usr/local/j2sdk-1.3.0/bin
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The /etc/profile script is a system script executed for each user when the user logs in. Individual users can customize their PATH variables by placing a PATH assignment in either their .bashrc or .bash_profile files. In this way, users can access commands and programs they create or install for their own use in their own user directories (see 13 for more details). On Red Hat, user .bash_profile files will already contain the following PATH definition. Notice the use of $PATH, which keeps all the directories already added to the PATH in previous startup scripts like /etc/profile and /etc/rc.d/ rc.sysinit.
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PATH=$PATH:$HOME/bin
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The following entry in the . bash_profile file adds a user's newbin directory to the PATH variable. Notice both the colon placed before the new directory and the use of the $HOME variable to specify the pathname for the user's home directory.
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PATH=$PATH:$HOME/bin/:$HOME/newbin
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In the .bash_profile file for the root user, the PATH definition also includes sbin directories. The sbin directories hold system administration programs that the root user would need to have access to. The root user PATH is shown here:
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Once you finish developing your software, you may then want to distribute it to others. Ordinarily, you would pack your program into a tar archive file. People would then download the file and unpack it. You would have to include detailed instructions on how to install it and where to place any supporting documentation and libraries. Any number of variations might stop installation of a program. The RPM is designed to automate these tasks. RPM automatically installs software on a system in the designated directories, along with any documentation, libraries, or support programs. It has complex and powerful capabilities, and can handle the most complex programs. Simple examples of its use are provided here. Note The Autoconf program is used to configure the source code for an application automatically to a given system.
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The package creation process is designed to take the program through several stages, starting with unpacking it from an archive, and then compiling its source code, and, finally, generating the RPM package. You can skip any of these stages, up to the last one. If your software is already unpacked, you can start with compiling it. If your software is compiled, you can start with installation. If it is already installed, you can go directly to creating the RPM package. RPM makes use of three components to build packages: the build tree, the rpmrc configuration files, and an rpm spec script. The build tree is a set of special instructions used to carry out the different stages of the packaging process. The rpm spec script contains instructions for creating the package, as well as the list of files to be placed in it. The rpmrc files are used to set configuration features for RPM. The /usr/lib/rpm/ rpmrc file holds the default options for your system and is always read. You can also set up a /etc/rpmrc file for global options you want to set for your system. Entries here will override those in the /usr/lib/rpm/rpmrc file. You can also set up a local .rpmrc file in your home directory, which will override both of these. To obtain a listing of the /usr/lib/rpm/rpmrc file, enter
$ rpm --showrc
The build tree directories, listed in the following table, are used to hold the different files generated at each stage of the packaging process. The SOURCES directory holds the compressed archive. The BUILD directory holds the source code unpacked from that archive. The RPMS directory is where the RPM package containing the executable binary program is placed, and SRPMS is where the RPM package containing the source code is placed. If you are creating a package from software stored in a compressed archive, such as a tar.gz file, you first must copy that file to the build tree's SOURCES directory.
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