%files %doc README /usr/bin/bookrec /usr/man/man1/bookrec.1 in Software

Generation QR Code JIS X 0510 in Software %files %doc README /usr/bin/bookrec /usr/man/man1/bookrec.1

%files %doc README /usr/bin/bookrec /usr/man/man1/bookrec.1
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RPM Build Operation
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To create an RPM software package, you use the rpm build options (listed in Table 31-4) with the rpm command, followed by the name of a spec file. The -bl option checks to see if all the files used for the software are present. The -bb option builds only the binary package, whereas -ba builds both binary and source packages. They expect to find the compressed archive for the software in the build tree's SOURCES directory. The -ba and -bb options execute every stage specified in the rpm spec script, starting from the prep stage, to unpacking an archive, and then compiling the program, followed by installation on the system, and then creation of the package. The completed RPM package for executable binaries is placed in a subdirectory of the build tree's RPMS directory. This subdirectory has a name representing the current platform. For a PC, this is i386, and the package is placed in the RPMS/i386 subdirectory. The source-code package is placed directly in the SRPMS directory. Table 31-4: The RPM Build Options Description Create both the executable binary and source code packages. Perform all stages in the spec file: prep, build, install, and create the packages. Create only the executable binary package. Perform all stages in the spec file: prep, build, install, and create the package. Run only the prep stage from the spec file (%prep). Do a "list check." The %files section from the spec file is macro-expanded, and checks are made to ensure the files exist. Do both the prep and build stages, unpacking and compiling the software (%prep and %build). Do the prep, build, and install stages, unpacking, compiling, and installing the software (%prep, %build, and %install). Skip to specified stage, not executing any previous stages. Only valid with -bc and -bi. Remove the build tree after the packages are made. Do not execute any build stages. Used to test spec files. RPM installs the source code package and performs a prep, compile, and install. RPM first installs the named source package and does a prep, compile, and install, and then rebuilds a new binary package. List the configuration variables for the /usr/lib/rpm/rpmrc file.
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Option -ba
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-bb -bp -bl -bc -bi --short-circuit --clean --test --recompile source_package_file --rebuild source_package_file --showrc
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The following program generates both a binary and a software package, placing them in the build tree's RPMS/i386 and SRPMS directories. The name of the spec file in this example is bookspec.
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An executable binary package has a name consisting of the software name, the version number, the release number, the platform name (i386), and the term "rpm". The name, version, and release are separated by hyphens, whereas the release, platform name, and the rpm term are separated by periods. The name of the binary package generated by the previous example, using the bookspec spec script, generates the following name:
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The source code package has the same name, but with the term "src" in place of the platform name:
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bookrec-1.0-2.src.rpm
32: File System Administration
Overview
Files reside on physical storage devices such as hard drives, CD-ROMs, or floppy disks. The files on each storage device are organized into a file system. The storage devices on your Linux system are treated as a collection of file systems that you can manage. When you want to add a new storage device, you will need to format it as a file system and then attach it to your Linux file structure. Hard drives can be divided into separate storage devices called partitions, each of which would have its own file system. You can perform administrative tasks on your file systems, such as backing them up, attaching or detaching them from your file structure, formatting new devices or erasing old ones, and checking a file system for problems. This chapter discusses how you can manage file systems on your storage devices such as CD-ROMs, floppy disks, and hard disk partitions. To access files on a device, you attach its file system to a specified directory. This is called mounting the file system. For example, to access files on a floppy disk, you first mount its file system to a particular directory. With Linux, you can mount a number of different types of file systems. You can even access a Windows hard drive partition or tape drive, as well as file systems on a remote server (see 37). Archives are used to back up files or to combine them into a package, which can then be transferred as one file over the Internet or posted on an FTP site for easy downloading. The standard archive utility used on Linux and Unix systems is tar, for which several GUI front ends exist. You have several compression programs to choose from, including GNU zip (gzip), Zip, bzip, and compress.
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