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Note During installation, Red Hat will recognize the IDE CD-R and CD-RW drives you have installed on your system, and will include the ide-scsi kernel parameter automatically as part of either your LILO or Grub boot loader configurations. You will not need to perform any of the specific configuration tasks described in this section.
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Redundant array of independent devices (RAID) is method of storing data across several disks to provide greater efficiency and redundancy. In effect, you can have several hard disks treated as just one hard disk by your operating system. RAID then efficiently stores and retrieves data across all these disks, instead of having the operating system separately access
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each one as a separate file system. Lower-level details of storage and retrieval are removed from concern of the operating system. This allows greater flexibility in adding or removing hard disks, as well as implementing redundancy in the storage system to provide greater reliability. With RAID, you can have several hard disks that are treated as one virtual disk, where some of the disks are used as real-time mirrors, duplicating data. RAID can be implemented on a hardware or software level. On a hardware level, you can have hard disks connected to a RAID hardware controller, usually a special PC card. Your operating system then accesses storage through the RAID hardware controller. Alternatively, you can implement RAID as a software controller, letting a software RAID controller program manage access to hard disks treated as RAID devices. The software version lets you use IDE hard disks as RAID disks. Linux uses the MD driver, supported in the 2.4 kernel, to implement a software RAID controller. Note Before you can use RAID on your system, make sure it is implemented on your kernel. If not, you will have to reconfigure and install a new version of the kernel (see 34). Check the Multi-Driver Support component in your kernel configuration. You can specify support of any or all of the RAID levels. RAID can be implemented at different levels depending on whether you want efficiency, redundancy, or reconstruction capability. For efficiency, RAID stores data using disk stripping, where data is organized into standardized strips that can be stored across the RAID drives for faster access (level 0). Redundancy is implemented with mirroring. With mirroring, the same data is written to each RAID drive (level 1). Each disk has a complete copy of all the data written, so that if one or more fails, the others still have your data. Redundancy can be very inefficient and take up a great deal of storage. It is usually implemented on RAID arrays of only two disk drives, where one is used as a real time backup. As an alternative, data can be reconstructed using parity information in case of a hard drive crash. Parity information is saved instead of full duplication of the data (level 5). Parity information takes up the space equivalent of one drive, leaving most of the space on the RAID drives free for storage. On Red Hat, RAID supports three levels as well as a simple linear implementation (see Table 3213). Table 32-13: RAID Levels Supported on Red Hat Description Implements disk stripping across drives with no redundancy. Implements a high level of redundancy. Each drive is treated as a mirror for all data. Implements a data reconstruction capability using parity information distributed across all drives. The parity information takes up the equivalent of one drive.
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Simply treats RAID hard drives as one virtual drive with no stripping, mirroring, or parity reconstruction. Note You can create and format RAID drives on Red Hat during installation. At that time you can use either fdisk or Disk Druid to create your RAID partitions and devices. Consult the Red Hat Customization Guide for details. Select the custom configuration for creating your partitions. You can then use Disk Druid (recommended) or fdisk to create RAID partitions.
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This section will discuss Linux software RAID devices as they are implemented using Red Hat RAID tools (see Table 32-14). A RAID device is called an md device because it uses the MD driver. These devices are already defined on your Red Hat Linux system in the /etc/dev directory, starting with md0. /dev/md0 is the first RAID device, and /dev/md1 is the second, and so on. Each RAID device, in turn, will use hard disk partitions, where each partition contains an entire hard disk. These partitions are usually referred to as RAID disks, whereas a RAID device is an array of the RAID disks its uses. Table 32-14: Red Hat RAID Tools Description Creates (configures) a RAID devices from a set of block devices, initializing them Activates RAID devices Activates older non-persistent linear and RAID 0 RAID devices
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