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# iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o eth0 -j MASQUERADE
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To change the source address of a packet leaving your system, you would use the POSTROUTING rule with the SNAT target. For the SNAT target, you use the - to-source option to specify the source address:
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# iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o eth0 -j SNAT --to-source 192.168.0.4
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To change the destination address of packets arriving on your system, you would use the PREROUTING rule with the DNAT target and the --to-destination option:
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# iptables -t nat -A PRETROUTING -i eth0 \ -j DNAT --to-destination 192.168.0.3
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To redirect an packet, you use the REDIRECT target on the PREROUTING chain:
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# iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -i eth1 --dport 80 -j REDIRECT --to-port 3128
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With the TOS and MARK targets, you can mangle the packet to control its routing or priority. A TOS target sets the type of service for a packet, which can set the priority using criteria such as normal-service, minimize-cost, and maximize-throughput, among others. The targets only valid for the NAT table are shown here: SNAT DNAT REDIRECT MASQUERADE MIRROR MARK TOS Modify source address; use --to-source option to specify new source address. Modify destination address; use --to-destination option to specify new destination address Redirect a packet. IP masquerading. Reverse source and destination and send back to sender. Modify the Mark field to control message routing. Modify the Type of Service field to manage the priority of the packet.
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Though you can enter iptables rules from the shell command line, when you shut down your system, these commands will be lost. On Red Hat, you can make use of the built-in support for saving and reading iptables rules using the iptables service script. Alternatively, you can manage the process yourself, saving to files of your own choosing. In either event, you will most likely need to place your iptables rules in a script that can then be executed directly. This way you can edit and manage a complex set of rules, adding comments and maintaining their ordering.
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Red Hat iptables Support
Red Hat provides support for iptables as part of its system configuration. When you install the Red Hat package for iptables, an iptables service script is installed that will read and save iptables commands using the /etc/sysconfig/iptables file. If you have set iptables to be started up automatically when you boot your system, this file will be checked to see if it exists and is not empty. If so, then iptables will automatically read the iptables commands that it holds. Red Hat is attempting to integrate iptables more smoothly into the system setup process. You can sidestep this automatic iptables setup by simply deleting the /etc/ sysconfig/iptables file (running lokkit and choosing No Firewall will do the same). Be sure you back it up first in case it has important commands.
It is possible to edit the /etc/sysconfig/iptables file directly and enter iptables commands, but it is not recommended. Red Hat adds some notation of its own, such as a colon at the beginning of each line, and uses the notation to detect commands. Instead, you should think of this file as holding a final installation of your iptables commands. You should think of the iptables service script that Red Hat provides as a versatile management tool, not as a service startup script. The use of the service command for this script can be confusing. The iptables script only manages iptables rules, flushing, adding, or reporting them. It does not start and stop the iptables service. If Netfilter is not running, you will need to instruct that it be started up when your system boots. For this, you can use setuptool (setup or Text Mode Setup Tool) to select System Services (ntsysv), then select ipchains from the list of services (press SPACEBAR). Make sure that ipchains is not selected. ipchains and iptables cannot run at the same time. The service script /etc/rc.d/init.d/iptables supports several options with which to manage your rules. The status option displays a listing of all your current rules. The stop option will flush your current rules. Unlike stop and status, the start and save options are tied directly to the /etc/sysconfig/iptables file. The start option will flush your current iptable rules and add those in the /etc/sysconfig/iptables file. The save option will save your current rules to the /etc/sysconfig/iptables file. Keep in mind that the stop and status operations work on the current iptables rules, no matter if they were added manually on the command line, added by your own script, or added by the start option from /etc/sysconfig/iptables. The following command will list your current rules:
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