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Perhaps the most effective way to think of the iptables service script is as an iptables development tool. When creating firewall rules, you should first create a script and place your rules in them, as described later on in the iptables script example. Make the script executable. Any changes you need to make as you debug your firewall, you make to this script. Before you run it, run the iptables service script with the stop option to clear out any previous rules:
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Then run your script, as shown here for the myfilters script:
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./myfilters
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To see how the commands have been interpreted by iptables, use the service script with the status option:
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For any changes, edit your iptables script. Then run the service script again to clear out the old rules. Run the iptables script again, and use the status option with the service script to see how the commands were implemented:
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service iptables stop ./myfilters service iptables status
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Once you are satisfied that your iptables rules are working correctly, you can save your rules to the /etc/sysconfig/iptables file. Use the iptables service script with the save option. Now your rules will be read automatically when your system starts up. You can think of the save operation as installing your iptables rules on your system, making them part of your system setup whenever you start your system.
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service iptables save
To make changes, modify your iptables script, run the service script with stop to clear out the old rules, run the iptables script, and then use the service script with the save option to generate a new /etc/sysconfig/iptables file.
Manually Saving and Reading Rules
Instead of using the service script, you can save your rules to a file of your choosing using the iptables-save script. The recommended file to use is /etc/iptables.rules. The iptables-save command outputs rules to the standard output. To save them in a file, you must redirect the output to a file with the redirection operator, >, as shown here:
iptables-save > /etc/iptables.rules
Then, to restore the rules, use the iptables-restore script to read the iptables commands from that saved file:
iptables-restore < /etc/iptables.rules
You could then place the iptables-restore operation in the /etc/rc.d/rc.local script to have it run automatically.
An iptables Script Example
You now have enough information to create a simple iptables script that will provide basic protection for a single system connected to the Internet. The following script provides an IP Tables filtering process to protect a local network and a Web site from outside attacks. It configures a simple firewall for a private network (check the ipchains HOWTO for a more complex example). If you have a local network, you could adapt this script to it. In this configuration, all remote access initiated from the outside is blocked, but two-way communication is allowed for connections that users in the network make with outside systems. In this example, the firewall system functions as a gateway for a private network whose network address is 192.168.0.0 (see Figure 40-1). The Internet address is, for the sake of this example, 10.0.0.1. The system has two Ethernet devices: one for the private network (eth1) and one for the Internet (eth0). The gateway firewall system also supports a Web server at address 10.0.0.2. Entries in this example that are too large to fit on one line are continued on a second line, with the newline quoted with a backslash.
Figure 40-1: A network with a firewall The basic rules as they apply to different parts of the network are illustrated in Figure 40-2.
Figure 40-2: Firewall rules applied to a local network example First a DROP policy is set up for INPUT and FORWARD built-in IP chains. This means that if a packet does not meet a criterion in any of the rules to let it pass, it will be dropped. Then both IP spoofing attacks and any attempts from the outside to initiate connections (SYN packets) are rejected. Outside connection attempts are also logged. This is a very basic configuration that can easily be refined to your own needs by adding IP Tables rules. myfilter
# Firewall Gateway system IP address is 10.0.0.1 using Ethernet device eth0 # Private network address is 192.168.0.0 using Ethernet device eth1 # Web site address is 10.0.0.2 # modprobe iptable_filter # turn off IP forwarding
echo 0 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward # Flush chain rules iptables -F INPUT iptables -F OUTPUT iptables -F FORWARD # set default (policy) rules iptables -P INPUT DROP iptables -P OUTPUT ACCEPT iptables -P FORWARD ACCEPT # IP spoofing, deny any packets on the internal network that have an external source address. iptables -A INPUT -j LOG -i eth1 \! -s 192.168.0.0/24 iptables -A INPUT -j DROP -i eth1 \! -s 192.168.0.0/24 iptables -A FORWARD -j DROP -i eth1 \! -s 192.168.0.0/24 # IP spoofing, deny any outside packets (any not on eth1) that have the source address of the internal network iptables -A INPUT -j DROP \! -i eth1 -s 192.168.0.0/24 iptables -A FORWARD -j DROP \! -i eth1 -s 192.168.0.0/24 # IP spoofing, deny any outside packets with localhost address # (packets not on the lo interface (any on eth0 or eth1) that have the source address of localhost) iptables -A INPUT -j DROP -i \! lo -s 127.0.0.0/255.0.0.0 iptables -A FORWARD -j DROP -i \! lo -s 127.0.0.0/255.0.0.0 # allow all incoming messages for users on your firewall system iptables -A INPUT -j ACCEPT -i lo # allow communication to the Web server (address 10.0.0.2), port www iptables -A INPUT -j ACCEPT -p tcp -i eth0 dport www -s 10.0.0.2 # Allow established connections from Web servers to internal network iptables -A INPUT -m state state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -i eth0 -p tcp sport www -s 10.0.0.2 -d 192.168.0.0/24 -j ACCEPT # Prevent new connections from Web servers to internal network iptables -A OUTPUT -m state state NEW -o eth0 -p tcp sport www -d 192.168.0.0/24 -j DROP # allow established and related outside communication to your system # allow outside communication to the firewall,except for ICMP packets iptables -A INPUT -m state state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -i eth0 -p \! icmp -j ACCEPT # prevent outside initiated connections iptables -A INPUT -m state state NEW -i eth0 -j DROP iptables -A FORWARD -m state state NEW -i eth0 -j DROP # allow all local communication to and from the firewall on eth1 local network iptables -A INPUT -j ACCEPT -p all -i eth1 -s 192.168.0.0/24 from the
# Set up masquerading to allow internal machines access to outside network iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o eth0 -j MASQUERADE # Accept ICMP Ping (0 and 8) and Destination unreachable (3) # Others will be rejected by INPUT and OUTPUT DROP policy messages
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