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A shell script is a text file that contains Linux commands, which you enter using any standard editor. You can then execute the commands in the file by using the filename as an argument to any sh or dot command (.). They read the commands in shell scripts and execute them. You can also make the script file itself executable and use its name directly on the command line as you would use the name of any command. To better identify your shell scripts, you can add the .sh extension to them, as in hello.sh. However, this is not necessary. You make a script file executable by setting its execute permission using the chmod command. The executable permission for the chmod command can be set using either symbolic or absolute references. The symbolic reference u+x sets the execute permission of a file. The command chmod u+x hello will set the execute permission of the hello script file. You can now use the script filename hello as if it were a Linux command. You only need to set the executable permission once. Once set, it remains set until you explicitly change it. The contents of the hello script are shown here.
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The user then sets the execute permission and runs the script using just the script name, in this case, hello.
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$ chmod u+x hello $ hello Hello, how are you $
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An absolute reference will set read and write permissions at the same time that it sets the execute permission. See 12 for a more detailed explanation of absolute and symbolic permission references. In brief, a 700 will set execute as well as read and write permissions for the user; 500 will set only execute and read permissions; 300 only execute and write permissions; and 400 only execute permission. Users most often set 700 or 500. In the next example, the user sets the execute permission using an absolute reference:
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$ chmod 750 hello $ hello Hello, how are you $
It is often helpful to include in a script file short explanations describing what the file's task is as well as describing the purpose of certain commands and variables. You can enter such explanations using comments. A comment is any line or part of a line preceded by a sharp (or hash) sign, #, with the exception of the first line. The end of the comment is the next newline character, the end of the line. Any characters entered on a line after a sharp sign will be ignored by the shell. The first line is reserved for identification of the shell, as noted in the following discussion. In the next example, a comment describing the name and function of the script is placed at the head of the file. hello
# The hello script says hello echo "Hello, how are you"
You may want to be able to execute a script that is written for one of the Linux shells while you are working in another. Suppose you are currently in the TCSH shell and want to execute a script you wrote in the BASH shell that contains BASH shell commands. First you would have to change to the BASH shell with the sh command, execute the script, and then change back to the TCSH shell. You can, however, automate this process by placing, as the first characters in your script, #!, followed by the pathname for the shell program on your system. Your shell always examines the first character of a script to find out what type of script it is a BASH, PDKSH, or TCSH shell script. If the first character is a space, the script is assumed to be either a BASH or PDKSH shell script. If there is a # alone, the script is a TCSH shell
script. If, however, the # is followed by a ! character, then your shell reads the pathname of a shell program that follows. A #! should always be followed by the pathname of a shell program identifying the type of shell the script works in. If you are currently in a different shell, that shell will read the pathname of the shell program, change to that shell, and execute your script. If you are in a different shell, the space or # alone is not enough to identify a BASH or TCSH shell script. Such identification works only in their own shells. To identify a script from a different shell, you need to include the #! characters followed by a pathname. For example, if you put #!/bin/sh at the beginning of the first line of the hello script, you could execute it directly from the TCSH shell. The script will first change to the BASH shell, execute its commands, and then return to the TCSH shell (or whatever type of shell it was executed from). In the next example, the hello script includes the #!/bin/sh command. hello
#!/bin/sh # The hello script says hello echo "Hello, how are you"
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