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$ cvs import m "Install myproject into CVS" myproject richp start
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To work on a file, you must first retrieve it from the repository using the check-out option, co. You then work on it in a project directory that will be created as a subdirectory in your local directory. When you are ready to check the file back into the repository, you use the commit option. The following example will extract the main.c file from the CVS repository for myproject:
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$ cvs co myproject/main.c $ cd myproject
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You then change to the subdirectory called myproject that has been created in the current working directory. There you will find the extracted version of main.c. You can then edit and change main.c. To check it back into the CVS repository, you would use the commit option.
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$ cvs commit -m "Modified main.c" main.c
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To see the changes, use the diff option. The rdiff option lets you see any changes to the entire release.
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$ cvs diff
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To check out the entire project, you use the project name. All the files for the project will be extracted to a subdirectory with that project name.
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$ cvs co myproject $ cd myproject
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You can then work on any of the files and then check in the entire project when you are finished.
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$ cvs commit -m "Major changes to myproject" myproject
As you work on a project with numerous files, you can use the update option, up, to check out just the ones you need.
$ cvs up myproject
To add a new file, you use the add option, and to delete a file you use the remove option. You effect the changes with the commit option.
$ cvs add mynewfile $ cvs commit -m "Added mynewfile" myproject
To create and extract new releases, you use the r options and specify the release number, such as 1.2 or 3.5. You create a new version with the commit command. The following example creates a new version, 1.2:
$ cvs commit -m "Created release 1.2" r 1.2 myproject
You can then check out that release with the co option:
$ cvs co r 1.2 myproject
To access a repository on the Internet, you simply specify as the repository root the Internet site and the remote directory for that repository. You can do this by assigning the repository to the CVSROOT shell variable. The format for specifying the remote repository is as follows:
:method:user@hostname:/path/to/repository
The following example assigns the repository for KDE to the CVSROOT variable:
export CVSROOT=:pserver:anonymous@anoncvs.kde.org:/home/kde
To access the remote repository, you first log in with the login option:
$ cvs login
Then you use the standard co (check-out) and commit options to check out and check in projects. When doing so, you may want to use the compression options such as -z4 to speed transmission time. Note If you want to set up a repository on your own system that is accessible over the Internet, you need to install and configure the CVS server.
Autoconf
If you were distributing the source code, users would have to determine how to adapt the source code to their systems. Any Unix or Linux system can compile any software written in the C programming language. Different Unix and Linux systems have different configurations, however, some using different compilers or placing programs and libraries in different system directories. Different types of support libraries may be present. In the past, to compile software on different systems, the software had to be configured manually for each system. For example, if your system has the gcc compiler instead of the cc compiler, you would have to set that feature in the software's Makefile. The Autoconf program is designed to automate the configuration process. It automatically detects the configuration of the current Unix system and generates an appropriate Makefile that can then be used to compile that software on this particular system. Much of the current software on the Internet in source form uses Autoconf. A detailed manual on Autoconf can be found in the /usr/info directory and is called autoconf.info. You can use the info command to view it. (You can also view the text with any text editor.) The general operations are described here. Software that uses Autoconf performs the configuration without any need of the actual Autoconf software. Special shell scripts included with the software detect the different system features the software needs. The ./configure command usually automatically configures the software for your system. As the configuration is performed, it checks for different features one by one, displaying the result of each check. The operation is entirely automatic and doesn't even require the identity of the system on which it is working. To create a configuration script for your own software, you use special Autoconf commands. The Autoconf applications package is available on your Red Hat CD-ROM. Generating the configurations involves several stages, using several intermediate configuration files.
Autoconf has many options designed to handle the requirements of a complex program. For a simple program, you may only need to follow the basic steps. The goal is to create a configure script. Two phases are in this process, using the autoscan and autoconf commands. The first phase creates a configure.scan file, using the autoscan command. The autoscan command is applied directly to your source code files. Next, check the configure.scan file for any errors with an editor, make any changes or additions you want, and then rename it as the configure.in file. This file is used as input for the autoconf command, which then generates the configure script. The autoscan step is an aid in the creation of the configure.in file, but autoscan and the configure.scan file it generates are optional. You can create your own configure.in file, entering various Autoconf macros. These are described in detail in the Autoconf info file. In addition, you need to create a version of the Makefile for your program, named makefile.in. This is essentially your original Makefile, with reference to special Autoconf variables. When the software is compiled on another system, the configure.in file detects the system's features, and then uses this information with the makefile.in file to generate a Makefile for that particular system. This new Makefile is then used to compile the program. Autoconf is designed to create values for different features, which can then be used with makefile.in to create a new Makefile containing those features. The feature values are placed in special shell variables called output variables. You should place references to these shell variables in the makefile.in file wherever you want to use these values. For example, the CC variable holds the name of the C compiler on your system (cc or gcc). The AC_PROG_CC macro in the configure script detects the C compiler in use and places its name in the CC variable. A reference to this variable should be placed in the makefile.in file wherever you invoke the C compiler. The variable name is bounded by two @ symbols. For example, @CC@ in makefile.in references the CC variable and its value is substituted in that place. Once you have the configure file, you no longer need the configure.in file. You only need configure, makefile.in, and the source code files along with any header files. The configure file is a shell script designed to execute on its own. Once another user has received the software package and unpacked all the source code files, you only need to take three steps: configuration, compilation, and installation. The ./configure command generates a customized Makefile for the user's system, the make command compiles the program using that Makefile, and the make install command installs the program on the user's system.
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