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gpg --fingerprint george@rabbit
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You do not have to check the fingerprint to have GPG operate. This is just an advisable precaution you can perform on your own. The point is that you need to be confident that the key you received is valid. Normally you can accept most keys from public servers or known sites like Red Hat as valid, although it is easy to check their posted fingerprints. Once assured
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of the key's validity, you can then sign it with your private key. Signing a key notifies GPG that you officially accept the key. To sign a key you use the gpg command with the --sign-key command and the key's name.
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gpg --sign-key george@rabbit
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Alternatively, you can edit the key with the --edit-key command to start an interactive session in which you can enter the command sign to sign the key and save to save the change. Signing a key involves accessing your private key, so you will be prompted for your passphrase. Once finished, leave the interactive session with the quit command. Normally, you would want to post a version of your public key that has been signed by one or more users. You can do the same for other users. Signing a public key provides a way to vouch for the validity of a key. It indicates that someone has already checked it out. Many different users could sign the same public key. For a key that you have received from another user, and that you have verified, you can sign and then return the signed version to that user. Once you have signed the key, you can generate a file containing the signed public version. You can then send this file to the user.
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gpg -a --export george@rabbit --output georgesig.asc
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The user would then import the signed key and then export it to a key server. Tip Should you want to start over from scratch, you can just erase your .gnupg directory, although this is a drastic measure-you lose any keys you have collected.
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GnuPG encryption is currently supported on Red Hat by KMail and exmh mail clients. You can also use the GNU Privacy Assistant (GPA), a GUI front end, to manage gpg tasks. You can also use the gpg command to manually encode and decode messages, including digital signatures if you wish. As you perform GPG tasks you will need to reference the keys you have using their key names. Bear in mind that you only need a unique identifying substring to select the key you want. GPG performs a pattern search on the string you specify as the key name in any given command. If the string matches more than one key, all those matching will be selected. In the following example, the Sendmail string selects matches on the identities of two keys.
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# gpg --list-keys "Sendmail" pub 1024R/CC374F2D 2000-12-14 Sendmail Signing Key/2001 <sendmail@Sendmail.ORG> pub 1024R/E35C5635 1999-12-13 Sendmail Signing Key/2000 <sendmail@Sendmail.ORG>
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gpg provides several options for managing secure messages. The e option encrypts messages, the a option generates an armored text version, and the s option adds a digital signature. You will need to specify the recipient's public key, which you should already have imported into your pubring file. It is this key that is used to encrypt the message. The recipient will then be able to decode the message with their private key. Use the --recipient or -r options to specify the name of the recipient key. You can use any unique substring in the user's public key name.
The e-mail address usually suffices. You use the d option to decode received messages. In the following example, the user encrypts (e) and signs (s) a file generated in armored text format (a). The -r option indicates the recipient for the message (whose public key is used to enrypt the message).
gpg e -s -a -o myfile.asc -r george@rabbit.mytrek.com myfile # mail george@rabbit.mytrek.com < myrile.asc
You can leave out the ASCII armour option if you want to send or transfer the file as a binary attachment. Without --armour or -a options, gpg generates an encoded binary file, not an encoded text file. A binary file can only be transmitted through e-mail as an attachment. As noted previously, ASCII armour versions usually have an extension of .asc, whereas binary version use .gpg. When the other user receives the file, they can save it to a file named something like myfile.asc, and then decode the file with the -d option. The -o option will specify a file to save the decoded version in. GPG will automatically determine if it is a binary file or an ASCII armour version.
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