asp net read barcode from image #include <qpopupmenu.h> #include <kmenubar.h> in Software

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#include <qpopupmenu.h> #include <kmenubar.h>
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You then define a menu bar object, or a pointer to one, and do the same for your menus. The class for a menu bar is KMenuBar, and the class for a menu is QPopupMenu. The following example defines pointers to a menu bar and a menu:
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KMenuBar *mymenubar; QPopupMenu *myfilemenu;
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If you defined pointers, you can create the menu and menu bar objects with the new operation as shown here. KMenuBar takes as its argument its parent. When defined in a class like a window, where you want the class itself to be the parent, you use the this pointer.
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mymenubar = new KMenuBar(this); myfilemenu = new QPopupMenu;
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You can then add the menu to the menu bar with the menu bar's insertItem member function. The first argument is the label you want displayed on the menu bar for the menu, and the second argument is the address of the menu object. The following example adds myfilemenu to mymenubar:
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mymenubar->insertItem("File", myfilemenu);
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Then, to add items to a particular menu, you use the menu object's insertItem member function. Its first argument is the label you want displayed for the item, and the next two arguments are references to a slot function to be executed when the item emits a signal. (This is the same as the slot arguments in the connect function.) The second argument for insertItem is the address of the object that holds the slot function, and the third argument is the slot function in that object to be executed. The following example creates an Exit item in the myfilemenu menu and connects it to the myexit slot function in the current object (denoted by the this pointer):
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myfilemenu->insertItem("Exit", this, SLOT(myexit()));
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KDE currently relies directly on the Qt Toolkit. Using just Qt objects, you can create an interface with a look and feel similar to KDE. You can create a Qt application using just Qt objects and the Qt libraries. This section provides a basic introduction to Qt programming. Both the KDE development site at developer.kde.org and the Qt Web site at www.trolltech.com provide very detailed documentation and tutorials on Qt programming. It is strongly recommended that you consult these resources for a detailed presentation of Qt programming and API references.
Web 44: Perl, Tcl/Tk, Expect, and Gawk
Perl, Tcl/Tk, Expect, and Gawk are scripting languages commonly used for customized applications on Linux. Your Red Hat Linux system installs these languages as part of its
development package. Though beyond the scope of this book, a brief introduction to these languages is provided in this chapter.
Perl
The Practical Extraction and Report Language (Perl) is a scripting language originally designed to operate on files, generating reports and handling very large files. Perl was designed as a core program to which features could be easily added. Over the years, Perl's capabilities have been greatly enhanced. It can now control network connections, process interaction, and even support a variety of database management files. At the same time, Perl remains completely portable. A Perl script will run on any Linux system, as well as most other operating systems such as Unix, Windows, and Mac. Perl is also used extensively for implementing CGI scripts on Web sites. There are extensive and detailed man pages on Perl, discussing all aspects of the language with a great many examples. The man pages begin with the term perl; for example, perlfunc discusses the built-in Perl functions and perlsyn describes the different control structures. You can also use the www.perl.com site to access and search documentation including the reference manual, the online man pages, and FAQs. There are extensive Internet resources for Perl. On the Perl Web site at www.perl.com, you can access documentation, software, newsgroups, and support. The site has programming and reference sections where you can access detailed FAQs on topics such as CGI, modules, and security. You can also access software archives and more detailed documentation. Specialized Perl Web sites focus on programming, conferences, and reference resources. The Comprehensive Perl Archive Network (CPAN) maintains FTP sites that hold an extensive collection of utilities, modules, documentation, and current Perl distributions. You can also link to a CPAN site through the Perl Web sites. Several of the Perl Web sites are listed here: www.perl.com www.perlmongers.org www.perl.org republic.perl.com www.perlreference.net www.perl.com/CPAN/CPAN.html The Perl advocacy group known as the perlmongers can be located at www.perl.org or www.perlmongers.org. The republic.perl.com site lets you join the Programming Republic of Perl. There are also several Usenet newsgroups that discuss different Perl issues. You can use them to post questions and check out current issues. Here is a listing of the current newsgroups: comp.lang.perl.announce comp.lang.perl.misc comp.lang.perl.modules comp.lang.perl.tk
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