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Usually, Perl commands are placed in a file that is then read and executed by the perl command. In effect, you are creating a shell in which your Perl commands are executed. Files
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containing Perl commands must have the extension .pl. This identifies a file as a Perl script that can be read by the perl command. There are two ways that you can use the perl command to read Perl scripts. You can enter the perl command on the shell command line, followed by the name of the Perl script. Perl will read and execute the commands. The following example executes a Perl script called hello.pl:
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$ perl hello.pl
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You can also include the invocation of the perl command within the Perl script file, much as you would for a shell script. This automatically invokes the Perl shell and will execute the following Perl commands in the script. The path /usr/bin/perl is the location of the perl command on the OpenLinux system. On other systems, it could be located in /usr/local/bin directory. The command which perl will return the location of Perl on your system. Place the following shell instruction on the first line of your file:
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#!/usr/bin/perl
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Then, to make the script executable, you would have to set its permissions to be executable. The chmod command with the 755 option sets executable permissions for a file, turning it into a program that can be run on the command line. You only have to do this once per script. You do not have to do this if you use the perl command on the command line, as noted previously. The following example sets the executable permissions for the hello.pl script:
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$ chmod 755 hello.pl
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As in C, Perl commands end with a semicolon. There is a print command for outputting text. Perl also uses the same escape sequence character to output newlines, \n, and tabs, \t. Comments are lines that begin with a #. The following is an example of a Perl script. It prints out the word "hello" and a newline. Notice the invocation of the perl command on the first line:
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helloprg #!/usr/bin/perl print "hello \n"; $ helloprg hello
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Perl Input and Output: <> and print
A Perl script can accept input from many different sources. It can read input from different files, from the standard input, and even from pipes. Because of this, you have to identify the source of your input within the program. This means that, unlike with Gawk but like with a shell program, you have to explicitly instruct a Perl script to read input. A particular source of input is identified by a file handle, a name used by programs to reference an input source such as a particular file. Perl already sets up file handles for the standard input and the standard output, as well as the standard error. The file handle for the standard input is STDIN. The same situation applies to output. Perl can output to many different destinations, whether they be files, pipes, or the standard output. File handles are used to identify files and pipes
when used for either input or output. The file handle STDOUT identifies the standard output, and STDERR is the file handle for the standard error. We shall first examine how Perl uses the standard input and output, and later discuss how particular files are operated on. Perl can read input from the standard input or from any specified file. The command for reading input consists of the less-than (<) and greater-than (>) symbols. To read from a file, a file handle name is placed between them, <MYFILE>. To read from the standard input, you can simply use the STDIN file handle, <STDIN>, which is similar to the read command in the BASH shell programming language.
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