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GTK+ is the widget set used for Gnome applications. Its look and feel was originally derived from Motif. The widget set is designed from the ground up for power and flexibility. For example, buttons can have labels, images, or any combination thereof. Objects can be dynamically queried and modified at runtime. It also includes a theme engine that enables users to change the look and feel of applications using these widgets. At the same time, the GTK+ widget set remains small and efficient. The GTK+ widget set is entirely free under the Library General Public License (LGPL). The LGPL enables developers to use the widget set with proprietary, as well as free, software (GPL would restrict it to just free software). The widget set also features an extensive set of programming language bindings, including C++, Perl, Python, Pascal, Objective C, Guile, and Ada. Internalization is fully supported, permitting GTK+-based applications to be used with other character sets, such as those in Asian languages. The drag-and-drop functionality supports both Xdnd and Motif protocols, allowing drag-and-drop operations with other widget sets that support these protocols, such as Qt and Motif.
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The Gnome interface consists of the panel and a desktop, as shown in Figure 8-1. The panel appears as a long bar across the bottom of the screen. It holds menus, programs, and applets. An applet is a small program designed to be run within the panel. On the panel is a button with a large bare foot imprint on it. This is the Gnome applications menu, the main menu. The menu operates like the Start menu in Windows, listing entries for applications you can run on your desktop. You can display panels horizontally or vertically, and have them automatically hide to show you a full screen.
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Figure 8-1: Gnome The remainder of the screen is the desktop. Here, you can place directories, files, or programs. You can create them on the desktop directly or drag them from a file manager window. A click-and-drag operation with the middle mouse button enables you to create links on the desktop to installed programs. Initially, the desktop only holds an icon for your home directory. Clicking it opens a file manager window to that directory. A right- click anywhere on the desktop displays a desktop menu (see Table 8-1) with which you can open new windows, create new folders, and mount floppy disks and CD-ROMs. Table 8-1: The Gnome 1.4 Desktop Menu (Nautilus) Description Starts a new Nautilus file manager window on your desktop, showing your home directory. Launches a new Gnome terminal window that navigates to the desktop directory. Creates a new directory on your desktop. Arranges your desktop icons. Displays submenu that lists floppy and CD-ROM devices that you
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Table 8-1: The Gnome 1.4 Desktop Menu (Nautilus) Description can select to mount. Mounted disks will appear as CD-ROM or floppy icons on your desktop, which you can use to access them or unmount later.
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Opens Gnome Control Center with the Background caplet selected to let you select a new background for your desktop.
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From a user's point of view, you can think of the Gnome interface as having four components: the desktop, the panel, the main menu, and the file manager. In its standard default configuration, the Gnome desktop displays a Folder icon for your home directory in the upper-left corner. Some distributions may include other icons, such as links to the Gnome Web site or to the Linux Documentation site. Initially, a file manager window opens on the desktop, displaying your home directory. The panel has several default icons: The main menu (Bare Foot), a screen lock feature (a padlock), the terminal program (Monitor), the Gnome Help System (Question Mark), the Start Here window (Pocket compass), the Gnome pager (Squares), and a clock. Red Hat 7.2 includes Mozilla. To start a program, you can select its entry in the main menu, click its application launcher button in the panel (if there is one), double-click its icon in either the desktop or the file manager window, drag a data file to its icon, or select the Run Program entry in the main menu. This opens a small window where you can type in the program name. When you first start Gnome, the Start Here window is displayed. From here, you can access your favorite Web sites and files (Favorites), select and run applications (Programs), customize your Gnome desktop (Preferences), and perform administrative tasks for both your system and your servers (Server Configuration and System Settings). Double-clicking an icon opens a window listing icons for sub-windows or tools. In effect, the Start Here window is mimicking the Main menu; you can select and run applications from the Start Here's Program window, just as you can from the Main menu's Program menu. The Preferences window lists Gnome configuration tools (capplets) for setting up your Gnome preferences. In effect, it replaces the Gnome Control Center window used in previous versions. See the Gnome Configuration section for more details. If you need to configure administrative tasks, such as setting up network connections or managing servers, you can choose the Server Configuration or System Settings windows. Most of those tools are accessible only by the root user. To quit Gnome, you select the Logout entry in the main menu or click the terminal icon displaying the moon (on Ximian Gnome you choose the Logout entry in the Menu panel's System menu). You can also add a Logout button to the panel, which you could use instead. To add the Logout button, right-click the panel and select the Add Logout Button entry. A Logout button then appears in the panel. When you log out, the Logout dialog box is displayed. You have three options. The first option, Logout, quits Gnome, returning you to the login window (or command line shell still logged into your Linux account, if you started Gnome with startx). The second option, Halt, not only quits Gnome, but also shuts down your entire system. The third option, the Reboot entry, shuts down and reboots your system. The Logout entry is selected by default. Halt and Reboot are only available to the root user. If normal users execute them, they are prompted to enter the root user password to shut down. You can also elect to retain your desktop by clicking the "Save current setup" check box. This reopens any programs or directories still open when you logged out. Gnome-compliant
window managers also quit when you log out of Gnome. You then must separately quit a window manager that is not Gnome-compliant after logging out of Gnome. The Gnome Help system, shown in Figure 8-2, provides a browser-like interface for displaying the Gnome user's manual, Man pages, and info documents. It features a toolbar that enables you to move through the list of previously viewed documents. You can even bookmark specific items. A Web page interface enables you to use links to connect to different documents. You can easily move the manual or the list of Man pages and info documents. You can place entries in the location box to access specific documents directly. Special URL-like protocols are supported for the different types of documents: ghelp: for Gnome help, man: for man pages, and info: for the info documents.
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