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252 Red Hat Linux Pocket Administrator
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For example, you could install a developmental version of the kernel, along with a current stable version, while keeping your old version. In the image line for each entry, you specify the filename of the kernel. You can create another boot loader entry for your older kernel.
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In the next example, the /etc/grub.conf file contains entries for two Linux kernels, one for the kernel installed earlier, 2.4.18-4, and one for a more recent kernel, 2.4.20-8. With GRUB, you only have to add a new entry for the new kernel. # grub.conf generated by anaconda # #boot=/dev/hda default=0 timeout=30 splashimage=(hd0,2)/boot/grub/splash.xpm.gz title New Linux (2.4.20-8) root (hd0,2) kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.4.20-8 ro \ root=/dev/hda3 hdc=ide-scsi initrd /boot/initrd-2.4.20-8.img title Old Linux (2.4.18-4) root (hd0,2) kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.4.18-4 ro \ root=/dev/hda3 hdc=ide-scsi initrd /boot/initrd-2.4.18-4.img title Windows XP rootnoverify (hd0,0) imakeactive chainloader +1
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If you are using LILO, you can configure your system to enable you to start any of your installed kernels. As seen in the Precautionary Steps section, you can create an added entry in the lilo.conf file for your old kernel. As you install new kernel versions, you simply add more entries to your LILO configuration file. Whenever you add
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a new entry, be sure to execute the lilo command to update LILO. Whenever you install the kernel on Red Hat using the RPM kernel package, the /boot/vmlinuz link is automatically changed to the new kernel. You can still create another LILO entry for your older kernel. In the next example, the lilo.conf file contains entries for two Linux kernels, one using the standard /boot/vmlinuz link, as well as windows. boot = /dev/hda install = /boot/boot.b message = /boot/message prompt timeout = 200 default = linux image = /boot/vmlinuz label = linux root = /dev/hda3 read-only image = /boot/vmlinuz-2.2.16 label = linux-2.2 root = /dev/hda3 read-only other = /dev/hda1 label = win table = /dev/hda
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If your system uses certain block devices unsupported by the kernel, like some SCSI, RAID, or IDE devices, you will need to load certain modules when you boot. Such block device modules are kept on a RAM disk that is accessed when your system first starts up (RAM disks are also used for diskless systems). For example, if you have a SCSI hard drive or CD-ROMs, the SCSI drivers for them are often held in modules that are loaded whenever you start up your system. These modules are stored in a RAM disk from which the startup process reads. If you create a new kernel that needs to load modules to start up, you must create a new RAM disk for those modules. You only need
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254 Red Hat Linux Pocket Administrator
to create a new RAM disk if your kernel has to load modules at startup. If, for example, you use a SCSI hard drive, but you incorporated SCSI hard drive and CD-ROM support (including support for the specific model) directly into your kernel, you don t need to set up a RAM disk (support for most IDE hard drives and CD-ROMs is already incorporated directly into the kernel). If you need to create a RAM disk, you can use the mkinitrd command to create a RAM disk image file. The mkinitrd command incorporates all the IDE, SCSI, and RAID modules that your system uses, including those listed in your /etc/modules.conf file. See the man pages for mkinitrd and RAM disk documentation for more details. mkinitrd takes as its arguments the name of the RAM disk image file and the kernel that the modules are taken from. In the following example, a RAM disk image called initrd-2.4.20-8.img is created in the /boot directory, using modules from the 2.4.20-8 kernel. The 2.4.20-8 kernel must already be installed on your system and its modules created. # mkinitrd /boot/initrd-2.4.20-8.img 2.4.20-8 You can select certain modules to load before or after any SCSI module. The --preload option loads before the SCSI modules, and --with loads after. For example, to load RAID5 support before the SCSI modules, use --preload= raid5: mkinitrd --preload=raid5 raid-ramdisk 2.4.20-8 In the grub.conf segment for the new kernel, place an initrd entry specifying the new RAM disk: initrd /boot/initrd-2.4.20-8.img
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