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As part of the installation process, Red Hat lets you create RAID devices from which you can also boot your system. Your Linux system will be configured to load RAID kernel support and automatically detect your RAID devices. The boot loader will be installed on your RAID device, meaning on all the hard disks making up that device. Red Hat does not support booting from RAID 5, only RAID 1. This means that if you want to use RAID 5 and still boot from RAID disks, you will need to create at least two (or more if you want) RAID devices using corresponding partitions for each device across your hard disks. One device would hold your /boot partition and be installed as a RAID 1 device. This RAID 1 device would be the first RAID device, md0, consisting of the first partition on each hard disk. The second RAID device, md1, could then be a RAID 5 device. It would consist of corresponding partitions on the other hard disks. Your system could then boot from the RAID 1 device, but use the RAID 5 device.
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If you do not create RAID disks during installation, but create them later and want to boot from them, you will have to make sure your system is configured correctly. The RAID devices need to be created with persistent superblocks. Support for the RAID devices has to be enabled in the kernel. On Red Hat, this support is enabled as a module. Difficulties occur if you are using RAID 5 for your / (root) partition. This partition contains the RAID 5 module, but to access the partition, you have to already load the RAID 5 module. To work around this limitation, you can create a RAM disk in the /boot partition that contains the RAID 5 module. Use the mkinitrd command to create the RAM disk and the -with option to specify the module to include.
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Linux software RAID now supports automatic detection of RAID devices. This allows your RAID devices to be detected automatically whenever your system boots, just like standard partitions. You can then use any RAID device (md) as you would a hard disk partition (hd or sd), using them in /etc/fstab file (see 5). Automatic detection is implemented using persistent superblocks placed on each RAID disk to hold configuration information. A persistent superblock needs to be created when you create the RAID device using mkraid. To instruct mkraid to create a persistent superblock, you specify the persistent-superblock option in the /etc/raidtab file, the RAID configuration file. Without the persistent superblock option, you would have to manually start your RAID devices with the raidstart command. raidstart -a starts up all your devices.
RAID Tools
The RAID tools are useful for managing software RAID devices on Linux. mkraid creates a RAID device, raidstop stops the device, and raidstart turns it on (see Table 4-2). These are discussed in detail in the next section.
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Tool mkraid raidstart raid0start raidstop Table 6-2.
Description Creates (configures) RAID devices from a set of block devices, initializing them. Activates RAID devices. Activates older non-persistent linear and RAID 0 RAID devices. Turns off a RAID device. RAID Tools
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Creating and Installing RAID Devices
If you created your RAID devices and their partitions during the installation process, you should already have working RAID devices. Your RAID devices will be configured in the /etc/raidtab file, and the status of your RAID devices will be listed in the /proc/mdstat file. You can manually start or stop your RAID devices with the raidstart and raidstop commands. The -a option operates on all of them, though you can specify particular devices if you want. To create a new RAID device manually for an already installed system, follow these steps: 1. Make sure that your kernel supports the RAID level you want for the device you are creating. To enable support for a RAID level in the kernel, use the kernel configuration tool to create a module for it, as discussed previously. 2. If you have not already done so, create the RAID disks (partitions) you will use for your RAID device. 3. Configure your RAID device (/dev/mdn) in the /etc/raidtab file, specifying the RAID disks to use. Be sure to specify the persistent superblock option to have your RAID devices automatically detected when you boot. 4. Create your RAID device with mkraid.
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