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We humans are fortunate. The human body is, all things considered, a nearly
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perfect machine: it is (usually) intelligent, it can lift heavy loads, it can move itself around, and it has built-in protective mechanisms to feed itself when hungry or to run away when threatened. Other living creatures on this earth possess similar functions, though not always in the same form. Robots are often modeled after humans, if not in form then at least in function. For decades, scientists and experimenters have tried to duplicate the human body, to create machines with intelligence, strength, mobility, and auto-sensory mechanisms. That goal has not yet been realized, but perhaps some day it will. Nature provides a striking model for robot experimenters to mimic, and it is up to us to take the challenge. Some, but by no means all, of nature s mechanisms human or otherwise can be duplicated to some extent in the robot shop. Robots can be built with eyes to see, ears to hear, a mouth to speak, and appendages and locomotion systems of one kind or another to manipulate the environment and explore surroundings. This is fine theory; what about real life Exactly what constitutes a real hobby robot What basic parts must a machine have before it can be given the title robot Let s take a close look in this chapter at the anatomy of robots and the kinds of materials hobbyists use to construct them. For the sake of simplicity, not every robot subsystem in existence will be covered, just the components that are most often found in amateur and hobby robots.
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10 ANATOMY OF A ROBOT
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People like to debate what makes a machine a real robot. One side says that a robot is a completely self-contained, autonomous (self-governed) machine that needs only occasional instructions from its master to set it about its various tasks. A self-contained robot has its own power system, brain, wheels (or legs or tracks), and manipulating devices such as claws or hands. This robot does not depend on any other mechanism or system to perform its tasks. It s complete in and of itself. The other side says that a robot is anything that moves under its own motor power for the purpose of performing near-human tasks (this is, in fact, the definition of the word robot in most dictionaries). The mechanism that does the actual task is the robot itself; the support electronics or components may be separate. The link between the robot and its control components might be a wire, a beam of infrared light, or a radio signal. In the experimental robot from 1969 shown in Fig. 2.1, for example, a man sat inside the mechanism and operated it, almost as if driving a car. The purpose of the four-legged lorry was not to create a self-contained robot but to further the development of cybernetic anthropomorphous machines. These were otherwise known as cyborgs, a concept further popularized by writer Martin Caidin in his 1973 novel Cyborg (which served as the inspiration for the 1970s television series, The Six Million Dollar Man). We won t argue the semantics of robot design here (this book is a treasure map after all, not a textbook on theory), but it s still necessary to establish some of the basic characteristics of robots. What makes a robot a robot and just not another machine For the purposes of this book, let s consider a robot as any device that in one way or another mimics human or animal functions. The way the robot does this is of no concern; the fact that it does it at all is enough. The functions that are of interest to the robot builder run a wide gamut: from listening to sounds and acting on them, to talking and walking or moving across the floor, to picking up objects and sensing special conditions such as heat, flames, or light. Therefore, when we talk about a robot it could very well be a self-contained automaton that takes care of itself, perhaps even programming its own brain and learning from its surroundings and environment. Or it could be a small motorized cart operated by a strict set of predetermined instructions that repeats the same task over and over again until its batteries wear out. Or it could be a radio-controlled arm that you operate manually from a control panel. Each is no less a robot than the others, though some are more useful and flexible. As you ll discover in this chapter and those that follow, how complex your robot creations are is completely up to you.
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