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FIGURE 19.17 Connection points and possible readings on a 5- or 6-wire unipolar stepper motor.
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Driving a robot Selecting a motor for your robot Connecting motors to computers, microcontrollers, and other electronic circuitry
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16, Robot Locomotion Principles 17, Choosing the Right Motor for the Job 29, Interfacing with Computers and Microcontrollers
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WORKING WITH SERVO MOTORS
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DC and stepper motors are inherently open feedback systems you give them juice,
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and they spin. How much they spin is not always known, not even for a stepper motor, which turns by finite degrees based on the number of pulses it gets. Should something impede the rotation of the motor it may not turn at all, but there s no easy, built-in way that the control electronics would know that. Servo motors, on the other hand, are designed for closed feedback systems. The output of the motor is coupled to a control circuit; as the motor turns, its speed and/or position are relayed to the control circuit. If the rotation of the motor is impeded for whatever reason, the feedback mechanism senses that the output of the motor is not yet in the desired location. The control circuit continues to correct the error until the motor finally reaches its proper point. Servo motors come in various shapes and sizes. Some are smaller than a walnut, while others are large enough to take up their own seat in your car. They re used for everything from controlling computer-operated lathes to copy machines to model airplanes and cars. It s the last application that is of most interest to hobby robot builders: the same servo motors used with model airplanes and cars can readily be used with your robot. These servo motors are designed to be operated via a radio-controlled link and so are commonly referred to as radio-controlled (or R/C) servos. But in fact the servo motor itself is not what is radio-controlled; it is merely connected to a radio receiver on the plane or car. The servo takes its signals from the receiver. This means you don t have to control your
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296 WORKING WITH SERVO MOTORS
robot via radio signals just to use an R/C servo unless you want to, of course. You can control a servo with your PC, a microcontroller such as the Basic Stamp, or even a simple circuit designed around the familiar 555 timer integrated circuit. In this chapter we ll review what R/C servos are, and how they can be put to use in a robot. We will limit the discussion to R/C servos. While there are other types of servo motors, it is the R/C type that is commonly available and reasonably affordable. For simplicity s sake, when you see the term servo in the text that follows understand that it specifically means an R/C servo motor, even though there are other types.
How Servos Work
Figure 20.1 shows a typical standard-sized R/C servo motor, which is used with model flyable airplanes and model racing cars. The size and mounting of a standard servo is the same regardless of the manufacturer, which means that you have your pick of a variety of makers. There are other common sizes of servo motors besides that shown in Fig. 20.1, however. We ll discuss these in a bit. Inside the servo is a motor, a series of gears to reduce the speed of the motor, a control board, and a potentiometer (see Fig. 20.2). The motor and potentiometer are connected to the control board, all three of which form a closed feedback loop. Both control board and motor are powered by a constant DC voltage (usually between 4.8 and 7.2 volts). To turn the motor, a digital signal is sent to the control board. This activates the motor, which, through a series of gears, is connected to the potentiometer. The position of the potentiometer s shaft indicates the position of the output shaft of the servo. When the potentiometer has reached the desired position, the control board shuts down the motor. As you can surmise, servo motors are designed for limited rotation rather than for continuous rotation like a DC or stepper motor. While it is possible to modify an R/C servo to rotate continuously (see later in this chapter), the primary use of the R/C servo is to achieve accurate rotational positioning over a range of 90 or 180 . While this may not sound like much, in actuality such control can be used to steer a robot, move legs up and down, rotate a sensor to scan the room, and more. The precise angular rotation of a servo in response to a specific digital signal has enormous uses in all fields of robotics.
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