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The incremental shaft encoder was first introduced in 18, Working with DC Motors. The shaft encoder is a disc that has many small holes or slots near its outside circumference. You attach the disc to a motor shaft or the shoulder or elbow joint. See 18 for more information on using shaft encoders. To review, shaft encoders are typically composed of a circuit connected to the phototransistor (the latter of which is baffled to block off ambient light). The phototransistor counts the number of on/off flashes and then converts that number into distance traveled. For example, one on/off flash may equal a 2 movement of the joint. Two flashes may equal a 4 movement, and so forth. The advantage of the incremental shaft encoder is that its output is inherently digital. You can use a computer, or even a simple counter circuit, to simply count the number of on/off flashes. The result, when the movement ends, is the new position of the arm.
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388 BUILD A REVOLUTE COORDINATE ARM
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Using DC motors and shaft encoders Using stepper motors to drive robot parts Different robotic arm systems and assemblies Attaching hands to robotic arms Interfacing feedback sensors to computers and microcontrollers
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18, Working with DC Motors 19, Working with Stepper Motors 24, An Overview of Arm Systems 27, Experimenting with Gripper Designs 29, Interfacing with Computers and Microcontrollers
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BUILD A POLAR COORDINATE ARM
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olar coordinate arms are ideal for use in a stand-alone robotic manipulator. They are fairly inexpensive and easy to build, and they can be adapted to a number of useful applications, especially robotic training. The design described in this chapter is a three-degreeof-freedom polar coordinate arm that is mounted on a stationary base. You can, if you wish, attach the arm to a mobile base or, for an even more outrageous project, add wheels or track to the base itself and make a giant rolling arm. The arm design presented here has no gripper, or hand, mechanism. You can attach any number of different grippers to the end of the arm. Choose the gripper based on the application you have in mind. Read more about robotic grippers in 27, Experimenting with Gripper Designs.
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Constructing the Base
The base measures 10 inches by 12 inches by 4 inches. The prototype for this book was made from aluminum shelving standards. Refer to Fig.26.1.You can also use 41/64-inchby-1/2-inch-by-1/16-inch aluminum channel stock, which is recommended. Construct the base by cutting four 10-inch and four 12-inch lengths. Cut each end at a 45 angle. Cut four 2 1/2-inch riser pieces. Do not miter the ends of these lengths. Assemble the top and
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390 BUILD A POLAR COORDINATE ARM
bottom frames using 1 1/2-inch-by-3/8-inch flat corner angles. Secure the stock to the corner angles with 8/32 by 1/2-inch bolts and 8/32 nuts. Refer to Fig. 26.2. Attach a 1-inch-by-1/2-inch corner angle bracket using 8/32 by 1/2inch bolts and nuts to each one of the short riser pieces. Attach 2-inch-by-1/2-inch flat mending plates to the top of the riser pieces. Connect the top and bottom frames with the risers spaced 2 3/4 inches from the corners. Use 8/32 by 1/2-inch bolts and 8/32 nuts.
Shoulder Rotation Mechanism
The shoulder rotation mechanism consists of a motor, a turntable, and a roller chain gear system. Start by adding a cross brace to the top of the base. Cut a 10 5/8-inch length of 57/64-inch-by-9/16-inch-by-1/16-inch aluminum channel stock. Mount it lengthwise in the center base using two 2 1/2-inch-by-1/2-inch flat mending iron Ts. Use 8/32 by 1/2inch bolts and 8/32 nuts to secure the Ts and cross brace into place. Drill a 3/8-inch hole in the center of the cross brace. Position one 3-inch-diameter ball-bearing turntable (lazy Susan) over the hole. Using the mounting holes on the baseplate of the turntable as a guide, mark corresponding mounting holes in the cross brace. Drill for 6/32 bolts (#28 bit) and attach the turntable using two 6/32 by 1/2-inch bolts and 6/32 nuts (see Fig. 26.3). Construct the center shaft of the arm with a 3-inch-by-10/24 pan-head stove bolt. Place a 1/2-inch-diameter bearing on either side of the channel stock. Be sure the center (rotating part) of the bearings rest over the hole, or they won t turn properly, and that the head of the bolt is positioned over the inner wheel of the bearing. Add a 1/4-inch spacer and lock the assembly into place with a 10/24 nut. On to the drive mechanics. The drive sprocket (35 teeth, 3-inch diameter, #25 roller chain) is sandwiched between two plastic spacers, as shown in Fig. 26.3. These spacers are actually closet pole holders. They already have holes drilled in the center; so you can just
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