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Copyright 2001 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Click Here for Terms of Use.
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that can be addressed individually or by nibble (4 bits), by byte (8 bits), or by word (16 bits). The OOPic also supports predefined objects that serve as analog-to-digital conversion inputs, serial inputs/outputs, pulse width modulation outputs, timers-counters, radiocontrolled (R/C) servo controllers, and 4x4-matrix keypad inputs. The device can even be networked with other OOPics as well as with other components that support the Philips I2C network interface. The OOPic comes with a 4K EEPROM for storing programs, but memory can be expanded to 32K, which will hold some 32,000 instructions. The EEPROM is hot swappable, meaning that you can change EEPRPOM chips even while the OOPic is on and running. When a new EEPROM is inserted into the socket, the program stored in it is immediately started. Additional connectors are provided on the OOPic for add-ins such as floatingpoint math; precision data acquisition; a combination DTMF, modem, musical-tone generator; a digital thermometer; and even a voice synthesizer (currently under development). The OOPic s hardware interface is an open system. The I2C interface specification, published by Philips, allows any IC that uses the I2C interface to talk to the OOPic. While the hardware capabilities of the OOPic are attractive, its main benefit is what it offers robot hackers: Much of the core functionality required for robot control is already embedded in the chip. This feature will save you time writing and testing your robot con-
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FIGURE 33.1 The OOPic supports 31 I/O lines and runs on 6 12 vdc power. Connectors are provided for the I/O lines, programming cable, memory sockets, and Philips I2C network.
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trol programs. Instead of needing several dozen lines of code to set up and operate an RC servo, you need only about four lines when programming the OOPic. A second important benefit of the OOPic is that its various hardware objects are multitasking, which means they run independently and concurrently of one another. For example, you might command a servo in your robot to go to a particular location. Just give the command in a single statement; your program is then free to activate other functions of your robot such as move another servo, start the main drive motors, and so forth. Once started by your program, all of these functions are carried out autonomously by the objects embedded within the OOPic. This simplifies the task of programming and makes the OOPic capable of coordinating many hardware connections at the same time. Fig. 33.2 shows a fire-fighting robot that uses several networked OOPics as its main processor. This two-wheeled robot hunts down small fires and literally snuffs them out with a high-powered propeller fan.
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FIGURE 33.2 This fire-fighting robot, built by OOPic developer Scott Savage, uses three OOPics wired together in a network to control the machine s central command, sensors, and locomotion.
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Mention the term object-oriented programming to most folks and they freeze in terror. Okay, maybe that s an exaggeration, but object-oriented programming seems like a black art to many, full of confusing words and complicated coding. Fortunately, the OOPic avoids the typical pitfalls of object-oriented programming. The OOPic chip supports an easy-to-use programming language modeled directly after Microsoft Visual Basic, so if you already know VB, you ll be right at home with the OOPic. Future versions of the OOPic software development platform will support C and Java syntax for those programmers who prefer these languages. The OOPic VB-like language offers some 41 programming commands. That s not many commands actually, but it s important to remember that the OOPic doesn t derive its flexibility from the Basic commands. Rather, the bulk of the chip s functionality comes from its built-in 31 objects. Each of these objects has multiple properties, methods, and events. You manipulate the OOPic s hardware objects by working with these properties, methods, and events. The Basic commands are used for program flow. Here s a sample OOPic program written in the chip s Basic language. I ll review what each line does after the code sample. This short program flashes a red LED on and off once a second. Fig. 33.3 shows how to connect the LED and a current-limiting resistor to I/O line 1 (pin 7 on the I/O connector) of the OOPic.
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Dim RedLED As New oDio1 Sub Main() RedLED.IOLine = 1 RedLED.Direction = cvOutput Do RedLED.Value = OOPic.Hz1 Loop End Sub
These lines comprise a complete, working program. Here s the program broken down:
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