barcode scanner vb.net textbox +V for OOPic +6 vdc 330 (optional) Any I/O pin Servo Gnd OOPic in Software

Encoding Data Matrix in Software +V for OOPic +6 vdc 330 (optional) Any I/O pin Servo Gnd OOPic

LISTING 33.1.
Data Matrix Recognizer In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
Drawing Data Matrix In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in Software applications.
' OOPic servo demonstrator ' Uses a standard R/C servo ' This program cycles a servo, connected to IOLine 31, ' for full rotation (0 to 180 degrees) ' Dimension needed objects Dim S1 As New oServo
Recognize DataMatrix In None
Using Barcode recognizer for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
DataMatrix Encoder In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode maker for .NET Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in .NET framework applications.
+V for OOPic +6 vdc 330 (optional) Any I/O pin Servo Gnd OOPic
Print Data Matrix 2d Barcode In .NET Framework
Using Barcode drawer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in ASP.NET applications.
Drawing Data Matrix In VS .NET
Using Barcode generation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in VS .NET applications.
Ground for +6 vdc servo power
DataMatrix Creation In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode drawer for .NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix 2d barcode image in VS .NET applications.
Generate Code 39 Extended In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create Code 39 Extended image in Software applications.
Connected grounds Ground for OOPic power
Code 128 Code Set A Drawer In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create Code 128A image in Software applications.
Generate Bar Code In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
FIGURE 33.5 Follow this basic wiring diagram to connect a standard R/C servo to the OOPic. Most servos use consistent color coding for their wiring: black for ground, red for V , and yellow or white for input (signal).
Drawing UCC - 12 In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create UPCA image in Software applications.
Barcode Generator In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create bar code image in Software applications.
526 USING THE OOPIC MICROCONTROLLER
UPC - E1 Drawer In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create GTIN - 12 image in Software applications.
Scan Bar Code In None
Using Barcode recognizer for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Dim x As New oByte Dim i As New oNibble ' 'First routine called when power is turned on Sub Main() Call Setup ' set up servo properties For i = 1 to 5 ' repeat motions five times S1 = 0 ' set servo to 0 degrees, and wait a while Call longdelay S1 = 63 ' set servo to 180 degrees, and wait a while Call longdelay Next i End Sub ' ' Delay loop routine Sub longdelay() For x = 1 To 200:Next x End Sub ' ' Setup routine Sub Setup() S1.Ioline = 31 ' Set servo to I/O line 31 (pin 26) S1.Center = 31 ' Set center to 31 (experiment for best results) S1.Operate = cvTrue ' Turn servo on End Sub
Printing Bar Code In .NET
Using Barcode generator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create barcode image in ASP.NET applications.
Code 128B Encoder In None
Using Barcode generation for Online Control to generate, create Code 128C image in Online applications.
POWERING THE SERVOS
Encoding UPC A In C#.NET
Using Barcode creation for VS .NET Control to generate, create UPC Code image in .NET applications.
Encoding UPC-A Supplement 2 In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode drawer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create UPC Symbol image in ASP.NET applications.
Note that separate battery power supplies were used for the OOPic and the servo. Most hobby R/C servos are designed to be operated with 4.5 to 7.2 vdc. Connecting both OOPic and servo to a single 6-volt supply can cause the OOPic to reset itself. Most servos draw considerable current when turned on, and this current can cause the supply voltage of a 6-volt battery pack to sag below the 4.5-volt level required by the OOPic. When the voltage drops below 4.5 volts, the OOPic s built-in brownout circuit kicks in, which resets the processor. This repeats continuously, and the net effect is a nonfunctioning circuit. One alternative is to power the whole shebang from a single 9- or 12-volt supply, but with higher voltage comes overpowered servos. Not all servos are built to handle the extra speed and heat caused by the higher voltage, and an early death for your servos could result. Therefore, it s best to use two different batteries. The OOPic is fine operating from a single 9-volt transistor battery. The servo runs from a set of four AA batteries.
Code 39 Creation In .NET Framework
Using Barcode generation for Reporting Service Control to generate, create Code39 image in Reporting Service applications.
UPC A Recognizer In Java
Using Barcode scanner for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
HOW THE OOPIC SERVO CODE WORKS
The first three lines in Listing 33.1 dimension (create in memory) the objects used in the OOPic program. S1 is the servo object; x and I are simple data objects that hold eight and four bits, respectively. The program itself begins with the Main subroutine, which is automatically run when the OOPic is first turned on or when it is reset. The first order of business is to call the Setup subroutine, located at the end of the program. In Setup, the program establishes that IO line 31 (pin 26 of the OOPic chip) is connected to the control input of the servo. The servo is then centered using a value of 31 (half of 64, considering 0 as the first valid digit). You need to experiment to find the mechanical center of the servo you are using.
OPERATING MODIFIED SERVOS 527
Each servo, particularly those that have different sizes and come from different manufacturers, can have a different mechanical center. Therefore, adjust this value up or down accordingly. Finally, the servo object is activated using the statement
S1.Operate = cvTrue
Notice the use of properties when working with the OOPic s objects. Properties are defined by specifying the name of the object, such as S1 for servo 1, a period (known as the member operator in programming parlance), then the property name. So, S1.Ioline sets (or reads) the IO line property for the S1 object. Similarly, S1.Center sets the center property, and S1.Operate turns the S1 object on or off. Most OOPic properties are read and write, meaning that you can both set and read their value. A few are read-only or write-only. Once you have set the servo up, you can manipulate it using the S1.Value property. In the demonstration program, the Value property is inferred because it is the so-called default property for servo objects. Therefore, it is only necessary to specify the name of the object and the value you want for it:
S1 = 0
This sets the servo all the way in one direction, and the following expression,
S1 = 63
sets the servo all the way in the other direction. Because the Value property is the default for the oServo object, the statement S1 63 is the same as writing S1.Value 63.
Exercise care when playing around with servos. Not all servos can travel a full 90 from center, especially if you have not properly set the mechanical center using the S1.Center property. For initial testing, use values slightly higher than 0 and slightly lower than 63 to represent the minimum and maximum servo movements, respectively. Otherwise, the OOPic may command the servo to move past an internal stop position, which can cause the gears to slip and grind. Left in this state the servo can be permanently damaged.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.