visual basic barcode scanner input Piezo Disc Touch Bar in Software

Creation ECC200 in Software Piezo Disc Touch Bar

Piezo Disc Touch Bar
Reading Data Matrix In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
Data Matrix 2d Barcode Printer In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create Data Matrix 2d barcode image in Software applications.
The laser-optic whisker system described earlier is a great way to detect even your robot s minor collisions. But it may be overkill in some instances, providing too much sensitivity for a zippy little robot always on the go. The soft-touch collision sensor described in this section, which uses commonly available piezo ceramic discs, is a good alternative to the laser-optic whisker system for lower-sensitivity applications. This sensor is constructed with a half-round bar to increase the area of contact.
DataMatrix Reader In None
Using Barcode decoder for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
ECC200 Creation In C#.NET
Using Barcode creator for VS .NET Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
596 COLLISION AVOIDANCE AND DETECTION
ECC200 Generation In VS .NET
Using Barcode creation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create ECC200 image in ASP.NET applications.
Print ECC200 In .NET
Using Barcode generation for VS .NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
CONSTRUCTION OF THE PIEZO DISC TOUCH BAR
Print Data Matrix In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode creation for .NET framework Control to generate, create Data Matrix 2d barcode image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Printing UCC.EAN - 128 In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create UCC-128 image in Software applications.
The main sensing elements of the piezo disc touch bar are two 1-inch-diameter bare piezo ceramic discs. These discs are available at Radio Shack and many surplus electronics stores; they typically cost under $1 or $2 each, and you can often find them for even less. You attach the discs to a 6 1/2-inch long support bar, which you can make out of plastic, even a long LEGO Technic beam. As shown in Fig. 36.25, you glue the discs into place with 1/8-inch foam (available at most arts and craft stores) so it sticks to the ceramic surface of the disc and acts as a cushion. You then bend a length of 1/8-inchdiameter aluminum tubing (approximately 8 9 inches) into a half-circle; thread through two small grommets, as shown in Fig. 36.25; and glue the grommets to the support bar. You flatten the ends of the tubing and bend them at right angles to create a foot ; the foot rests on the foam-padded surface of the discs. Fig. 36.26 shows a photograph of a finished piezo disc touch bar. The half-round tubing slopes downward slightly. This is intentional, so the robot can adequately sense objects directly in front of it near the ground. To construct the piezo disc touch bar I used hot-melt glue to attach the discs and grommets to the support bar. You can use most any other adhesive or glue you wish, but be sure it provides a good, strong hold for the different materials used in this project (metal, plastic, and rubber).
Barcode Maker In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
UPC A Creator In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create UPC-A Supplement 5 image in Software applications.
CONSTRUCTING THE INTERFACE CIRCUIT
Code39 Maker In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create Code-39 image in Software applications.
Painting Data Matrix ECC200 In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in Software applications.
Piezo discs are curious creatures: when a voltage is applied to them, the crystalline ceramic on the surface of the disc vibrates. It is the nature of piezoelectricity to be both a consumer and a producer of electricity. When the disc is connected to an input, any physical tap or pressure on the disc will produce a voltage. The exact voltage is approximately proportional to the amount of force exerted on the disc: apply a little pressure or tap and you get a little voltage. Apply a heavier pressure or tap, and you get a bigger voltage. The piezoelectric material on ceramic piezo discs is so efficient that even a moderately strong force on the disc will produce in excess of 5 or 10 volts. That s good in that it makes it easy to interface the discs to a circuit, since there is usually no need to amplify
European Article Number 8 Generator In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create EAN8 image in Software applications.
EAN 13 Creation In None
Using Barcode maker for Online Control to generate, create EAN13 image in Online applications.
Piezo disc Foam
Paint Data Matrix ECC200 In Java
Using Barcode creation for Java Control to generate, create Data Matrix 2d barcode image in Java applications.
Barcode Maker In Java
Using Barcode encoder for BIRT Control to generate, create barcode image in BIRT reports applications.
FIGURE 36.25 Glue the piezo discs to a piece of plastic; the plastic is a support bar for the discs that also makes it easier to mount the touch bar sensor onto your robot.
Create Code-39 In None
Using Barcode maker for Font Control to generate, create Code 39 Extended image in Font applications.
Painting Universal Product Code Version A In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode maker for VS .NET Control to generate, create UPC-A Supplement 5 image in VS .NET applications.
PIEZO DISC TOUCH BAR 597
Code 128 Code Set A Generation In None
Using Barcode printer for Online Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set A image in Online applications.
Creating European Article Number 13 In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode generation for .NET Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 13 image in VS .NET applications.
FIGURE 36.26 The finished prototype of the piezo disc touch bar. One variation is to mount the discs a little lower so the metal bar physically deforms the disc rather than pushes against its center.
the signal. But it s also bad in that the voltage from the disc can easily exceed the maximum inputs of the computer, microcontroller, or other electronic device you re interfacing with. (Pound on a piezo disc with a hammer, and, though it might be broken when you re done, it will also produce a thousand volts or more.) To prevent damage to your support electronics, attach two 5.1-volt zener diodes as shown in Fig. 36.27, to each disc of the touch bar. The zener diodes limit the output of the disc to 5.1 volts, a safe enough level for most interface circuitry. For an extra measure of safety, use 4.7-volt zeners instead of 5.1 volt. Note that piezoelectric discs also make great capacitors. This means that over time the disc will take a charge, and the charge will show up as a constantly changing voltage at the output of the disc. To prevent this, insert a resistor across the output of the disc and ground. In my experiments I found a resistor of about 82K eliminated the charge buildup without excessively diminishing the sensitivity of the disc. Experiment with the value of the resistor. A higher value will increase sensitivity, but it could cause an excessive charge buildup. A lower value will reduce the buildup but also reduce the sensitivity of the disc. It is also helpful to route the output of the disc to an op amp, preferably through a 100K or higher resistor.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.