vb.net barcode scanner programming ATTACHING THE DECK in Software

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ATTACHING THE DECK
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The deck is where you place the Pepbot s batteries and control circuitry. The deck is simply an 8u-by-16u LEGO building plate. A four-AA battery pack is affixed to the deck using double-sided foam tape. The microcontroller board (in this case an OOPic) is attached using small wire tires.
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CONSTRUCTING THE INTERFACE BOARD
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An interface board allows you to easily connect the microcontroller, batteries, and the two servos. It also provides adequate room if you want to add to the Pepbot, such as light sensors to detect light and dark, bumper switches to determine if the robot has hit an obstacle, or a small audio amplifier and speaker to allow the Pepbot to sound off when it wants to. Construct the interface board by using a small 2-by-3 inch project board, available at Radio Shack. You can use most any construction technique that you like. I used wire-wrapping for the Pepbot prototype. See Fig. 12.8 for a construction diagram; Fig. 12.9 shows the schematic you should follow. Note the 40-pin cable and connector. This cable attaches to the I/O (input/output) port of the OOPic microcontroller. While the OOPic provides for 31 inputs and outputs, the Pepbot uses only three of them. As you can see, there is plenty of room to expand the Pepbot with sensors, should you wish to do so. See 29, Interfacing with
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Servo connectors FIGURE 12.8 Construction plans for the Pepbot interface board. The board leaves plenty of room for expansion.
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BUILD THE LEGO PEPBOT
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Connector from OOPic Gnd I/O7 I/O30 I/O31 10K Servo2 Vin (6 vdc) Servo1 Ground FIGURE 12.9 Schematic for the Pepbot interface board.
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Computers and Microcontrollers, for some ideas on creating and interfacing sensors to robots.
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BATTERY POWER
The Pepbot is powered by two separate battery sources, as follows:
I A pack of four AA cells provides power to the two R/C servo motors. You may use 1.5-
volt alkaline cells or 1.2-volt nickel-cadmium or nickel-metal hydride batteries. However, if you use 1.2-volt cells the servos will run a little slower than under 1.5-volt cells (4.8 volts for the four batteries, as opposed to 6 volts). Under normal use, this battery pack will last for about 30 60 minutes of play time, so you may wish to use rechargeable alkalines to save money. I A 9-volt transistor battery provides power to the microcontroller. The microcontroller consumes little current, so this battery should last for a long time under normal use. The separate battery supplies serve an important purpose: R/C servo motors consume a lot of current when they are first turned on, so much, in fact, that the power for the fourbattery pack can dip to under 4.5 volts. The OOPic, like most microcontrollers, employs a brownout circuit that resets the controller when the voltage falls below a certain level. This prevents the controller from operating in an unstable state. Using the same power pack for both servos and microcontroller can cause erratic behavior in your programs. For ease of connection, attach a female connector to the end of the battery leads for both the four-AA pack and the 9-volt battery. Both connectors should be the common 0.100inch pin type. Note that the OOPic microcontroller board already contains a 5 vdc (volts dc) regulator, so no outboard voltage regulator is required. The R/C servos do not require regulation. The ground connections of both battery packs should be connected together.
CONNECTING THE PIECES
Thanks to the interface board, connecting the servos, batteries, and microcontroller is a snap. The steps are as follows:
1. Connect the four-AA battery pack (observe proper polarity!) to the interface board.
156 BUILD CUSTOM LEGO-BASED ROBOTS
2. Connect both the right and left servos to their respective connections on the interface
board. Again, observe correct polarity. One or both servos may jump slightly when plugged in, but they should not run. 3. Connect the I/O cable between the OOPic and the interface board. 4. Connect the 9-volt battery to the OOPic microcontroller board. Figure 12.10 shows the completed Pepbot.
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