vb.net barcode reader from image ATTACHING SERVOS WITH GLUE in Software

Encoding QR in Software ATTACHING SERVOS WITH GLUE

22.13.1 ATTACHING SERVOS WITH GLUE
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Gluing is a quick and easy way to mount servos on most any robot body material, including heavy cardboard and plastic. Use only a strong glue, such as two-part epoxy or hot-melt glue. When gluing it is important that all surfaces be clean. Rough up the surfaces with a file or heavy-duty sandpaper for better adhesion. If you re gluing servos to LEGO parts, apply a generous amount so the extra adequately fills between the nubs. LEGO plastic is hard and smooth, so be sure to rough it up first.
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22.13.2 ATTACHING SERVOS WITH SCREWS OR BOLTS
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A disadvantage of mounting servos with glue is that it s more or less permanent (and, according to Murphy s Law, more permanent than you d like if you want to remove the servo, less permanent if you want the servo to stay in place!). For the greatest measure of
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WORKING WITH SERVO MOTORS
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FIGURE 22-11 Use this template to construct a servo mounting bracket. The template may not be reproduced in 1:1 size, so be sure to measure before cutting your metal or plastic.
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FIGURE 22-12 A servo mounted on a homemade servo bracket.
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22.14 FROM HERE
flexibility, use screws or bolts to mount your servos to your robot body. All servos have mounting holes in their cases; it s simply a matter of finding or drilling matching holes in the body of your robot. Servo mounts are included in many R/C radio transmitters and separately available servo sets. You can also buy them separately from the better-stocked hobby stores. The servo mount has space for one, two, or three servos. The mount has additional mounting holes that you can use to secure it to the side or bottom of your robot. Most servo mounts are made of plastic, so if you need to make additional mounting holes they are easy to drill. You can also construct your own servo mounting brackets using 1 8-in-thick aluminum or plastic. A template is shown in Fig. 22-11. (Note: the template is not to scale, so don t trace it to make your mount. Use the dimensions to fashion your mount to the proper size.) The first step in constructing your own servo mounting brackets is to cut and drill the aluminum or plastic, as shown in Fig. 22-12. Use a small hobby file to smooth off the edges and corners. The mounting hole centers provided in the template are designed to line up with the holes in LEGO Technic beams. This allows you to directly attach the servo mounts to LEGO pieces. Use 3 32 or 4 40 nuts and bolts, or 4 40 self-tapping screws, to attach the servo mount to the LEGO beam. Fig. 22-12 shows a servo mounted on a bracket and attached to a LEGO beam. If necessary, the servos can be easily removed for repair or replacement.
22.14 From Here
To learn more about . . . Using batteries to power your robot Fundamentals of robot locomotion Choosing the best motor for your robot Ways to implement computers and microcontrollers in your robots Interfacing servos and other motors to control circuitry Read 17, Batteries and Robot Power Supplies 18, Principles of Robot Locomotion 19, Choosing the Right Motor 12, An Overview of Robot Brains 14, Computer Peripherals
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PA R T
PRACTICAL ROBOTICS PROJECTS
Copyright 2006, 2001, 1987 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Click here for terms of use.
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CHAPTER
BUILDING A ROVERBOT
magine a robot that can vacuum the floor for you, relieving you of that time-consuming household drudgery and freeing you to do other, more dignified tasks. Imagine a robot that patrols your house, inside or out, listening and watching for the slightest trouble and sounding the alarm if anything goes amiss. Imagine a robot that knows how to look for fire, and when it finds one, puts it out. Think again. The compact and versatile Roverbot introduced in this chapter can serve as the foundation for building any of these more advanced robots. You can easily add a small DC-operated vacuum cleaner to the robot, then set it free in your living room. Only the sophistication of the control circuit or computer running the robot limits its effectiveness at actually cleaning the rug. You can attach light and sound sensors to the robot, and provide it with eyes that help it detect potential problems. These sensors, as it turns out, can be the same kind used in household burglar alarm systems. Your only job is to connect them to the robot s other circuits. Similar sensors can be added so your Roverbot actively roams the house, barn, office, or other enclosed area looking for the heat, light, and smoke of fire. An electronically actuated fire extinguisher is used to put out the fire. The Roverbot described on the following pages represents the base model only (see Fig. 23-1). The other chapters in this book will show you how to add onto the basic framework to create a more sophisticated automaton. The Roverbot borrows from techniques described in 10, Metal Platforms. If you haven t yet read that chapter, do so now; it will help you get more out of this one.
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