vb.net barcode reader from image BUILDING A ROVERBOT in Software

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BUILDING A ROVERBOT
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To learn more about . . . Constructing robots using metal parts and pieces Powering your robot using batteries Selecting a motor for your robot Operating your robot with a computer Read 10, Building a Metal Platform 17, Batteries and Robot Power Supplies 19, Choosing the Right Motor 12, An Overview of Robot or Microcontroller Brains
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BUILDING A HEAVY-DUTY SIXLEGGED WALKING ROBOT
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he strange and unique contraption shown in Fig. 24-1 walks on six legs and turns corners with an ease and grace that belies its rather simple design. The Walkerbot design described in this chapter is for the basic frame, motor, battery system, running gear, and legs. You can embellish the robot with additional components, such as arms, a head, as well as computer control. The frame is oversized (in fact, it s too large to fit through some inside doors!), and there s plenty of room to add new subsystems. The only requirement is that the weight doesn t exceed the driving capacity of the motors and batteries and that the legs and axles don t bend. The prototype Walkerbot weighs about 50 lb. It moves along swiftly and no structural problems have yet occurred. Another 10 or 15 lb could be added without worry.
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The completed Walkerbot frame measures 18 in wide by 24 in long by 12 in deep. Construction is all aluminum, using a combination of 41 64-by-1 2-by-1 16-in channel stock and 1-by1-by-1 16-in angle stock. Build the bottom of the frame by cutting two 18-in lengths of channel stock and two 24-in lengths of channel stock, as shown in Fig. 24-2 (refer to the parts list in Table 24-1). Miter the ends with a 45 angle. Attach the four pieces using 11 2-by-3 8-in flat angle irons
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FIGURE 24-1 The completed Walkerbot.
and secure them with 3-by-1 2-in bolts and nuts. For added strength, use four bolts on each corner. In the prototype Walkerbot, many of the nuts and bolts were replaced with aluminum pop rivets in order to reduce the weight. Until the entire frame is assembled, however, use the bolts as temporary fasteners. Then, when the frame is assembled, square it up and replace the bolts and nuts with rivets one at a time. Construct the top of the frame in the same manner.
FIGURE 24-2 Cutting diagram for the frame of the Walkerbot (two sets).
24.1 FRAME
TABLE 24-1 4 4 4 8 4 2 Misc.
Parts List for Walkerbot Frame 24-in lengths 41 64-by-1 2-by-1 16-in aluminum channel stock 18-in lengths 41 64-by-1 2-by-1 16-in aluminum channel stock 12-in lengths 1-by-1-by-1 16-in aluminum angle stock 11 2-by-3 8-in flat angle iron 24-in lengths 1-by-1-by-1 16-in aluminum angle stock 175 8-in lengths 1-by-1-by-1 16-in aluminum angle stock
32 stove bolts, nuts, tooth lock washers, as needed
Connect the two halves with four 12-in lengths of angle stock, as shown in Fig. 24-3. Secure the angle stock to the frame pieces by drilling holes at the corners. Use 8 32-by-1 2-in bolts and nuts initially; exchange for pop rivets after the frame is complete. The finished frame should look like the one diagrammed in Fig. 24-4. Complete the basic frame by adding the running gear mounting rails. Cut four 24-in lengths of 1-by-1-by-1 16-in angle stock and two 175 8-in lengths of the same angle stock. Drill
1" x 1" x1/16" Angle Stock Bottom View 1/2" x 8/32 Bolt Nut Tooth Lock Washer
FIGURE 24-3 Hardware detail for securing the angle stock to the top and bottom frame pieces.
BUILDING A HEAVY-DUTY SIX-LEGGED WALKING ROBOT
FIGURE 24-4 How the Walkerbot frame should look so far.
4-in holes in four long pieces as shown in Fig. 24-5. The spacing between the sets of holes is important. If the spacing is incorrect, the U-bolts won t fit properly. Refer to Fig. 24-6. When the holes are drilled, mount two of the long lengths of angle stock as shown. The holes should point up, with the side of the angle stock flush against the frame of the robot. Mount the two short lengths on the ends. Tuck the short lengths immediately under the two long pieces of angle stock you just secured. Use 8 32-by-1 2-in bolts and nuts to secure the pieces together. Dimensions, drilling, and placement are critical with these components. Put the remaining two long lengths of drilled angle stock aside for the time being.
20 3/4" 11 1/4" 1 3/4"
Front 24"
1 1/2"
FIGURE 24-5 Cutting and drilling guide for the motor mount rails (four).
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