vb.net barcode reader from image OTHER TYPES OF TOUCH SENSORS in Software

Encoder Quick Response Code in Software OTHER TYPES OF TOUCH SENSORS

29.6 OTHER TYPES OF TOUCH SENSORS
Denso QR Bar Code Reader In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
Printing QR Code JIS X 0510 In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create QR image in Software applications.
1 13 R1 10M
QR-Code Reader In None
Using Barcode recognizer for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Generate QR Code In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode generation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create QR Code ISO/IEC18004 image in .NET applications.
14 2 Output
Creating Denso QR Bar Code In .NET Framework
Using Barcode generation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create QR Code ISO/IEC18004 image in ASP.NET applications.
Encoding QR In .NET
Using Barcode creator for VS .NET Control to generate, create Quick Response Code image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
IC1 4066 Piezo Film 7
QR-Code Generation In VB.NET
Using Barcode encoder for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Denso QR Bar Code image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Making Barcode In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create bar code image in Software applications.
FIGURE 29-13 A strike/vibration indicator using Kynar piezo film.
Data Matrix ECC200 Printer In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create Data Matrix 2d barcode image in Software applications.
Bar Code Encoder In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create bar code image in Software applications.
making stores. To use them, pierce the film to make a small hole, wrap the end of the wire around the rivet post, and squeeze the riveting tool (you may need to use metal washers to keep the wire in place).
EAN 13 Maker In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 13 image in Software applications.
GTIN - 12 Printer In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create UPC-A Supplement 2 image in Software applications.
29.5.4 USING KYNAR PIEZO FILM AS A MECHANICAL TRANSDUCER
Create USPS Intelligent Mail In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create Intelligent Mail image in Software applications.
Paint Code 128A In C#.NET
Using Barcode encoder for VS .NET Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set A image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Fig. 29-13 shows a simple demonstrator circuit you can build that indicates each time a piece of Kynar film is struck. Tapping the film produces a voltage output, which is visually
Data Matrix 2d Barcode Recognizer In Java
Using Barcode reader for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
EAN-13 Drawer In C#.NET
Using Barcode printer for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create EAN-13 image in .NET applications.
FIGURE 29-14 The prototype Kynar piezo bend sensor.
USS-128 Scanner In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode recognizer for Visual Studio .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
Code 128C Generator In Java
Using Barcode generation for Java Control to generate, create Code 128C image in Java applications.
THE SENSE OF TOUCH
Generate Data Matrix ECC200 In Java
Using Barcode creation for Java Control to generate, create Data Matrix 2d barcode image in Java applications.
Paint EAN13 In None
Using Barcode creation for Microsoft Excel Control to generate, create UPC - 13 image in Office Excel applications.
indicated when the LED flashes. The 4066 IC is an analog switch. When a voltage is applied to pin 3, the connection between pins 1 and 2 is completed and that finishes the electrical circuit to light the LED. For a robotic application, you can connect the output to a computer or microcontroller.
29.5.5 CONSTRUCTING A KYNAR PIEZO FILM BEND SENSOR
You can easily create a workable touch sensor by attaching one or two small Kynar transducers to a thick piece of plastic. The finished prototype sensor is depicted in Fig. 29-14. The plastic membrane could be mounted on the front of a robot, to detect touch contact, or even in the palm of the robot s hand. Any flexing of the membrane causes a voltage change at the output of one or both Kynar film pieces.
29.6 Other Types of Touch Sensors
The human body has many kinds of touch receptors embedded within the skin. Some receptors are sensitive to physical pressure, while others are sensitive to heat. You may wish to endow your robot with some additional touch sensors like:
Heat sensors can detect changes in the heat of objects within grasp. Heat sensors are available in many forms, including thermisters (resistors that change their value depending on temperature) and solid-state diodes that are specifically made to be ultrasensitive to changes in temperature. 34, Fire Detection Systems, discusses using solidstate temperature sensors. Air pressure sensors can be used to detect physical contact. The sensor is connected to a flexible tube or bladder (like a balloon); pressure on the tube or bladder causes air to push into or out of the sensor, thereby triggering it. To be useful, the sensor should be sensitive to increases in air pressure to about 1 lb/in2, or less. Resistive bend sensors, originally designed for use with virtual reality gloves, vary their resistance depending on the degree of bending. Mount the sensor in a loop, and you can detect the change in resistance as the loop is deformed by the pressure of contact. Microphones and other sound transducers make effective touch sensors. You can use microphones, either standard or ultrasonic, to detect sounds that occur when objects touch. Mount the microphone element on the palm of the gripper or directly on one of the fingers or pinchers. Place a small piece of felt directly under the element, and cement it in place using a glue that sets hard. Run the leads of the microphone to the sound trigger circuit, which should be placed as close to the element as possible.
29.7 FROM HERE
29.7 From Here
To learn more about . . . Designing and building robot hands Connecting sensors to computers and microcontrollers Collision detection systems Building light sensors Fire, heat, and smoke detection for robotics Read 28, Experimenting with Gripper Designs 14, Computer Peripherals 30, Object Detection 32, Robot Vision 34, Fire Detection Systems
This page intentionally left blank
CHAPTER
OBJECT DETECTION
ou ve spent hundreds of hours designing and building your latest robot creation. It s filled with complex little doodads and precision instrumentation. You bring it into your living room, fire it up, and step back. Promptly, the beautiful new robot smashes into the fireplace and scatters itself over the living room rug. You remembered things like motor speed controls, electronic eyes and ears, even a synthetic voice, but you forgot to provide your robot with the ability to look before it leaps. Object detection systems take many forms and work in many different ways requiring different interfaces and programming. This chapter presents a number of passive and active object detection systems that are easy to build and use. Some of the systems are designed to detect objects close to the robot (called near-object, or proximity, detection), and some are designed to detect objects at distances of 10 ft or more (called far-object detection). Depending on how the sensor works, your robot may change trajectory to avoid an object far away from it or it could turn hard away or stop to avoid something that was sensed immediately in its path. The material in this chapter may seem very similar to that of 29, the Sense of Touch, and there is some overlap in the material and programming differences. To clear up any confusion, 29 discusses different methods of detecting whether a gripper has detected an object to pick up, while in this chapter the sensors reviewed are for mobile robots to ensure that they are not damaged by nor do they damage objects they collide with as they are moving about.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.