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FIGURE 33-14 Polaroid 6500 module connected to a BS2 using a monostable multivibrator and two D-flip flops to ensure the waveform passed to the BS2 is a pulse and available when the BS2 is ready for it.
NAVIGATION
TABLE 33-3 BS2 Polaroid 6500 IC1 IC2 R1 R2 C1, C2 C3, C4 C5 C6 Misc.
Polaroid 6500 Interface Circuit Parallax BS2 Polaroid 6500 ranging module with wires attached for breadboard interfacing 74LS123 dual monostable multivibrator chip 74LS74 dual D-flip flop chip 10k resistor 2.2k resistor 0.1 F capacitor 0.01 F capacitor 1 F capacitor 1000 F capacitor (see text) Breadboard, BS2 communication/programming interface, 9-V battery, 6-V lantern battery (see text)
Init Signal
123 _Q Output
Echo Signal Delay Pulse Passed to the BS2
FIGURE 33-15 Operation of the BS2 Polaroid 6500 module interface. Note that the Init signal causes the 74LS123 to trigger, starting a pulse output on the 74LS74 to be measured by the BS2. When the echo has returned, the 74LS123 is triggered again, changing the state of the 74LS74 and completing the pulse.
33.7 WHERE AM I : SIGHTING LANDMARKS
'{$STAMP BS2} '{$PBASIC 2.50} ' Pin/Variable Declarations InitPin PIN 15 InitSetupPin PIN 13 FlightPin PIN 0 SoundFlight VAR Word SoundIn VAR Word SoundFt VAR Word ' Initialization/Mainline LOW InitPin HIGH InitSetupPin INPUT FlightPin DO
Set Initialization Pin To O/P & Low Pulsed Low to Setup Conditions
' Repeat forever PULSOUT InitSetupPin, 10 ' Setup Hardware for Pulse Read HIGH InitPin ' Output to Cause 150 ms Pulse PULSIN FlightPin, 0, SoundFlight IF (SoundFlight <> 0) THEN' If "0" Returned, Echo not found DEBUG "Time of Flight is ", DEC SoundFlight 2, " ms", CR SoundIn = SoundFlight / 153 SoundFt = SoundIn / 12: SoundIn = SoundIn // 12 DEBUG "Distance from Sensor to Object ", DEC SoundFt, "' ", DEC SoundIn, REP 34\1, CR ENDIF LOW InitPin PAUSE 1000 ' Wait a Second before Repeating LOOP
33.7 Where Am I : Sighting Landmarks
Explorers rely on landmarks to navigate wide-open areas. It might be an unusual outcropping of rocks or a bend in a river. Or the 7-Eleven down the street. In all cases, a landmark serves to give you general bearings. From these general bearings you can more readily navigate a given locale. Robots can use the same techniques, though rocks, rivers, and convenience stores are somewhat atypical as useful landmarks. Instead, robots can use such techniques as beacons to determine their absolute position within a known area. The following sections describe some techniques you may wish to consider for your next robot project.
33.7.1 INFRARED BEACON
Unless you confine your robot to playing just within the laboratory, you ll probably want to provide it with a means to distinguish one room in your house from the next. This is particularly important if you ve designed the robot with even a rudimentary form of object and area mapping. This mapping can be stored in the robot s memory and used to steer around objects and avoid walls. For less than a week s worth of groceries, you can construct an infrared beacon system
NAVIGATION
that your robot can use to determine when it has passed from one room to the next. The robot is equipped with a receiver that will detect transmitters placed in each room. These transmitters send out a unique code, which the robot interprets as a specific room. Once it has identified the room, it can retrieve the mapping information previously stored for it and use it to navigate through its surroundings. The beacon system presented here is designed around a set of television and VCR remote control chips sold by Holtek. The chips are reasonably inexpensive but can be difficult to find. The chips used in this project are HT12D and HT12E, available from Jameco (www.jameco.com, but you should check the Internet for other sources as well). You can, of course, use just about any wireless remote control system you desire. The only requirements are that you must be able to set up different codes for each transmitter and that the system must work with infrared light. You can connect the four-bit output of the HT-12D decoder IC to a microcontroller or computer. You will also want to connect the VD (valid data) line to a pin of your microcontroller or computer. When this line winks LOW, it means there is valid data on the four data lines. The value at the four data lines will coincide with the setting of the four-position DIP switch on each transmitter.
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