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FIGURE 39-1 The LM339 comparator, along with a potentiometer, resistor, and LED are effective tools for monitoring voltage levels within a robot. Note that it may be necessary to have a separate power supply for the LM339 if the robot s power supply drops during operation.
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inputs and outputs of the robot s microcontroller during operation may require you to stand over it to monitor the LCD s output, which may possibly result in you being detected by the robot and your presence causing the robot to behave differently than if you were further away from the robot.
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39.2.3 HYPOTHESIZING ABOUT THE PROBLEM
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With a clear understanding of how the robot should behave and how it is actually behaving, the differences should become very obvious and allow you to start making theories regarding what is the root cause of the problem. When you are hypothesizing about the problem, it is very important to (a) keep an open mind as to the cause of the problem and (b) avoid trying to come up with solutions, no matter how obvious they seem. It is easy to short-circuit this process and decide upon an obvious fix without working through the rest of the failure analysis. Keeping an open mind is extremely difficult. To force yourself to look at different solutions, you should try to come up with at least three different possible root causes for the problem. To illustrate this point, consider the case of a differentially driven robot with a light plastic frame that scrapes along the ground during changes in robot direction at the point where the batteries are mounted (see Fig. 39-2). As well as being scraped, the operation of the
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39.2 THE PROCESS OF FIXING PROBLEMS
Driving Wheel
Batteries Robot
Scrapes to Bottom of Robot
Front Caster
FIGURE 39-2 When the robot is sitting still, the battery pack does not touch the ground. But after operation, the chassis underneath the battery pack is scraped and the robot moves as expected.
robot seems to be erratic when the chassis comes into contact with the running surface. These observations are confirmed by photographing the robot during changes in direction. With this information, you could make the following theories regarding the problems the robot is having:
1. The robot is accelerating too quickly, and the chassis is distorting during starting, stop-
ping, and direction changing.
2. The inertia of the battery pack is causing the chassis to flex. 3. The motors are too powerful, and they are warping the chassis during startup or stop-
ping.
4. The caster is digging into the running surface during operation, causing the chassis to
distort. A generic theory could be that the chassis isn t strong enough, but this will steer you toward a single solution (strengthening the chassis) while the four expanded theories give you a number of ideas to try and fix the problem. Along with these four theories, you could probably come up with more that you can compare against the data that you collect in the first two steps and see which hypothesis best fits the data. There s a good chance that you will have to go back and look at different aspects of the robot; for example, if the caster was the problem, it should have some indications of high drag on a large part of its surface, not just the small area where it was in contact with the running surface.
39.2.4 PROPOSING CORRECTIVE ACTIONS
Once you are comfortable with understanding the different possible root causes of the failure, you can start listing out possible corrective actions. Like the multiple possible root causes listed in the previous step, you should also list out multiple possible corrective
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actions. While some may jump out at you, after considering different options, a much more elegant and easier to implement solution may become obvious. In the previous section, it was mentioned that the obvious possible root cause of the robot scraping against the ground is that the chassis is simply not strong enough. The obvious solution to this problem is to strengthen the chassis. While it may fix the problem, it is probably not the optimal solution, as strengthening the chassis could require you to effectively redesign and rebuild the robot. Before embarking on this large amount of effort, you could review a number of different solutions:
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.
Strengthening the chassis. Using a lighter battery pack. Decreasing the robot s acceleration. Relocating the battery pack. Changing the front caster. Using larger drive wheels.
The amount of work required for each of the different solutions varies. Along with documenting the amount of work for each solution, the potential cost and length of time needed to implement the solution can be documented in order to be able to choose the best possible fix.
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