vb.net barcode scanner source code To Turn On the Motor, Connect the NPN Bipolar Transistor s Base to +V in Software

Making Quick Response Code in Software To Turn On the Motor, Connect the NPN Bipolar Transistor s Base to +V

To Turn On the Motor, Connect the NPN Bipolar Transistor s Base to +V
Read Denso QR Bar Code In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
Generating Quick Response Code In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create Quick Response Code image in Software applications.
FIGURE 5-14 The complete transistor circuit needed to turn on and off a DC electric motor.
Recognizing QR In None
Using Barcode recognizer for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Make QR Code ISO/IEC18004 In Visual C#
Using Barcode encoder for .NET framework Control to generate, create QR image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS
Painting QR Code In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode printer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create QR-Code image in ASP.NET applications.
QR Code JIS X 0510 Maker In .NET
Using Barcode drawer for VS .NET Control to generate, create QR Code JIS X 0510 image in VS .NET applications.
Motor
Make QR Code ISO/IEC18004 In VB.NET
Using Barcode maker for .NET framework Control to generate, create QR Code image in VS .NET applications.
Generate UPC Code In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create Universal Product Code version A image in Software applications.
Forwards Control Connect to +V to Turn Motor Forwards
Generating Bar Code In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
Paint DataMatrix In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create Data Matrix 2d barcode image in Software applications.
Backwards Control Connect to +V to Turn Motor Backwards
Barcode Drawer In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
GS1 - 13 Drawer In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 13 image in Software applications.
FIGURE 5-15 The six transistor H-bridge motor driver allows a DC motor to be turned on and off and run in either direction. Do not connect both controls to +V.
ITF Generation In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create Uniform Symbology Specification ITF image in Software applications.
Data Matrix Recognizer In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode scanner for Visual Studio .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
current and high tolerance. MOSFET transistors don t use the standard base-emitter collector connections. Instead, they call them gate, drain, and source. The operational differences among the different transistors will become clearer as you become more experienced in creating electronic circuits.
Code 39 Full ASCII Creation In Objective-C
Using Barcode encoder for iPhone Control to generate, create Code 3 of 9 image in iPhone applications.
Bar Code Drawer In Objective-C
Using Barcode maker for iPhone Control to generate, create bar code image in iPhone applications.
5.8 Grounding Circuitry
EAN / UCC - 13 Drawer In None
Using Barcode drawer for Font Control to generate, create GS1 - 13 image in Font applications.
Barcode Creator In VS .NET
Using Barcode creator for Reporting Service Control to generate, create barcode image in Reporting Service applications.
When wiring electronic circuits, it is useful to have a large common negative voltage connection or ground built into the robot. This connection is normally thought of as being at earth ground and is the basic reference for all the components in the circuit. Having a common ground also simplifies the task of drawing schematics; instead of wiring all the negative connections to the negative power supply, all the negative connections are wired to the three bar symbol shown in Fig. 5-16. Positive voltages are normally indicated with an arrow pointing upward and the label of the positive voltage to be used. These conventions will be used throughout this book.
Encoding ANSI/AIM Code 39 In Objective-C
Using Barcode maker for iPad Control to generate, create Code 3 of 9 image in iPad applications.
Making Matrix Barcode In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode encoder for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Matrix 2D Barcode image in ASP.NET applications.
FIGURE 5-16 This symbol is used for the common negative voltage connection in an electronic circuit.
5.10 SCHEMATICS AND ELECTRONIC SYMBOLS
Part Number
Index Mark
74LS04 0582 Date Code
FIGURE 5-17 Integrated circuits (ICs) are common in most any electronic system, including robotics.
5.9 Integrated Circuits
The integrated circuit forms the backbone of the electronics revolution. The typical integrated circuit comprises many transistors, diodes, resistors, and even capacitors. As its name implies, the integrated circuit, or IC, is a discrete and wholly functioning circuit in its own right. ICs are the building blocks of larger circuits. By merely stringing them together you can form just about any project you envision. Integrated circuits are most often enclosed in dual in-line packages (DIPs), like the one shown in Fig. 5-17. This type of component has a number of pins that can be inserted into holes of a printed circuit board and is also known as a pin through hole (PTH) component. There are numerous types of packages and methods of attaching chips to PCBs but beginners should be working with just PTH DIPs. As with transistors, ICs are identified by a unique code, such as 7400 or 4017. This code indicates the type of device. You can use this code to look up the specifications and parameters of the IC in a reference book. Many ICs also contain other written information, including manufacturer catalog number and date code. Do not confuse the date code or catalog number with the code used to identify the device.
5.10 Schematics and Electronic Symbols
Electronics use a specialized road map to indicate what components are in a device and how they are connected together. This pictorial road map is the schematic, a kind of blueprint of everything you need to know to build an electronic circuit. Schematics are composed of special symbols that are connected with intersecting lines. The symbols represent individual components, and the lines represent the wires that connect these components together. The language of schematics, while far from universal, is intended to enable most anyone to duplicate the construction of a circuit with little more information than a picture. The experienced electronics experimenter knows how to read a schematic. This entails recognizing and understanding the symbols used to represent electronic components and how these components are connected. All in all, learning to read a schematic is not difficult. Fig. 5-18 shows many of the most common symbols.
ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS
FIGURE 5-18 These symbols are used on schematics to represent different electronic devices.
5.11 From Here
To learn about . . . Finding electronic components Working with electronic components Using electronic components with robot control computers Read 4, Buying Parts 6, Electronic Construction Techniques 12, An Overview of Robot Brains
CHAPTER
TOOLS
ake a look at the tools in your garage or workshop. You probably already have all the implements required to build your own robot. Unless your robot designs require a great deal of precision (and most hobby robots don t), a common assortment of hand tools is all that s really needed to construct robot bodies, arms, drive systems, and more. Most of the hardware, parts, and supplies you need are also things you probably already have, left over from old projects around the house. You can readily purchase the pieces you don t have at a hardware store, a few specialty stores around town, or through the mail. This chapter discusses the basic tools for hobby robot building and how you might use them. You should consider this chapter only as a guide; suggestions for tools are just that suggestions. By no means should you feel that you must own each tool or have on hand all the parts and supplies mentioned in this chapter. You may have tools that you like to use that aren t listed in this chapter. Once again, the concept behind this book is to provide you with the know-how to build robots from discrete modules. In keeping with that open-ended design, you are free to exchange parts in the modules as you see fit. Some supplies and parts may not be readily available to you, so it s up to you to consider alternatives and how to work them into your design. Ultimately, it will be your task to take a trip to the hardware store, collect the items you need, and hammer out a unique creation that s all your own.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.