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7.1 Soldering Tips and Techniques
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Soldering is the process of heating up two pieces of metal together and electrically joining them using a (relatively) low melting temperature metal (normally a lead-tin alloy). Discrete components, chips, printed circuit boards, and wires can all be joined by soldering them together. Soldering is not a construction technique and will not provide a robust mechanical connection that can be used in robot structures. Soldering sounds and looks simple
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Copyright 2006, 2001, 1987 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Click here for terms of use.
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ELECTRONIC CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES
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enough, but there is a lot of science behind it and care must be taken to get strong, reliable connections (called joints) without damaging any of the components being soldered. Fig. 7-1 shows the important aspects of a solder joint. The two pieces of metal to be connected (which is almost always copper) are joined by another metal (the solder) melted to them. When the solder is melted to the copper, it should wet smoothly over the entire copper surface. Even though the solder melts at a lower temperature than the copper, there are very thin interfaces produced that consist of a copper/solder alloy. These interfaces are called the intermetallic regions of the solder joints and one of the goals of soldering is to make sure these regions are as thin as possible to avoid alloying of the copper and solder (which raises the melting point of the solder and makes the joint brittle). The following sections provide an overview of soldering. If you solder sporadically with months in between turning on your soldering iron, it is a good idea to review this material to ensure that the work is carried out efficiently and safely.
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7.1.1 SOLDER SAFETY
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Keep the following points in mind when soldering:
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Keep your fingers away from the tip of the soldering pencil. A hot soldering iron can seriously burn you. Never touch a solder joint until after it has cooled. While using the soldering iron, always place it in a properly designed iron stand. To avoid inhaling the fumes for any length of time, work only in a well-ventilated area. While the fumes produced during soldering are not particularly offensive, they can be surprisingly toxic. Always wear eye protection such as safety glasses or optically clear goggles when clipping leads. Keep a fire extinguisher handy, just in case.
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Solder
Copper
Intermetallic Regions
FIGURE 7-1 Solder joint cross-section.
7.1 SOLDERING TIPS AND TECHNIQUES
7.1.2 TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT
7.1.2.1 Soldering iron and tip When you are looking for a soldering iron, choose one that is designed for electronics, like the one in Fig. 7-2. The iron should have a fairly low wattage rating (not higher than 30 W). Most soldering irons or pencils are designed so you can change the tips as easily as changing a lightbulb. Make sure that you have the smallest pointed tip available for your iron as it will be required for small electronics assembly. It is a good idea to buy a soldering iron that is grounded to keep from running the risk of damaging sensitive electronic components by subjecting them to electrostatic discharge. Do not use the instant-on type soldering guns favored in the old tube days, and definitely do not use an iron that was designed for plumbing. These types of irons produce far too much unregulated heat and can easily damage the components being soldered. If your soldering iron has a temperature control and readout, dial it to between 665 and 680 F. This is the typical melting point for solder and will pose the minimum danger of damage to the electronic components. If your iron has just the control and lacks a heat readout, set it to low initially. Wait a few minutes for the iron to heat up, then try one or two test connections. Adjust the heat control so that solder flows onto the connection in under 5 s. Remember that when you are not using your soldering iron, keep it in an insulated stand.
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