BUILD THE BUGGYBOT in Software

Generator Quick Response Code in Software BUILD THE BUGGYBOT

10.2 BUILD THE BUGGYBOT
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Drill Holes for Caster Plate 6" by 12" Aluminum Sheet 5 1/2"
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FIGURE 10-2 Drilling diagram for the Buggybot frame.
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10.2.3 SUPPORT CASTER
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The Buggybot uses the two-wheel-drive tripod arrangement. You need a caster on the other end of the frame to balance the robot and provide a steering swivel. The 11 2-in swivel caster is not driven and doesn t do the actual steering. Driving and steering are taken care of by the drive motors. Referring to Fig. 10-7, attach the caster using two 6 32 by 1 2-in bolts and nuts. Note that the mechanical style of the caster, and indeed the diameter of the caster wheel, is dependent on the diameter of the drive wheels. Larger drive wheels will require either a different mounting or a larger caster. Small drive wheels will likewise require you to adjust the caster mounting and possibly use a smaller-diameter caster wheel.
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FIGURE 10-3 Bend the aluminum sheet at the approximate angles shown here.
10.2.4 BATTERY HOLDER
The motors require an appreciable amount of current, so the Buggybot really should be powered by heavy-duty C- or D-size cells. The prototype Buggybot used a two-cell D battery holder. The holder fits nicely toward the front end of the robot and acts as a good coun-
Tire
Motor and Gearbox
Motor Shaft
Coupler (with Setscrew) Output Gear (with Setscrew)
FIGURE 10-4 Secure the output shaft of the motor so that almost all of the shaft sticks out on one side of the motor.
10.2 BUILD THE BUGGYBOT
1/2" x 6/32 Bolt Base Mounting Flange Nut
Motor Gearbox
FIGURE 10-5 The gearboxes and motors are attached to the frame of the Buggybot using ordinary hardware.
terweight. You can secure the battery holder to the robot using double-sided tape or hookand-loop (Velcro) fabric.
10.2.5 WIRING DIAGRAM
The basic Buggybot uses a manual wired switch control. The control is the same one used in the plastic Minibot detailed in 8, Plastic Platforms. Refer to the wiring diagram in Fig. 8-4 of that chapter for information on powering the Buggybot.
FIGURE 10-6 Attach the foam wheels (with plastic hubs) for the Buggybot onto the shafts of the motors.
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1/2" x 6/32 Bolt Base Tooth Lockwasher Nut Caster
FIGURE 10-7 Mounting the caster to the Buggybot.
To prevent the control wire from interfering with the robot s operation, attach a piece of heavy wire (the bottom rail of a coat hanger will do) to the caster plate and lead the wire up it. Use nylon wire ties to secure the wire. The completed Buggybot is shown in Fig. 10-1.
10.3 Test Run
You ll find that the Buggybot is an amazingly agile robot. The distance it needs to turn is only a little longer than its length, and it has plenty of power to spare. There is room on the robot s front and back to mount additional control circuitry. You can also add control circuits and other enhancements over the battery holder. Just be sure that you can remove the circuit(s) when it comes time to change or recharge the batteries.
10.4 From Here
To learn more about . . . Plastic robots Metal robots Using batteries Selecting the right motor Using a computer or microcontroller Read 8, Plastic Platforms 9, Wooden Platforms 17, All about Batteries and Robot Power Supplies 19, Choosing the Right Motor for the Job 12, An Overview of Robot Brains
CHAPTER
HACKING TOYS
eady-made toys can be used as the basis for more complex home-brew hobby robots. The toy industry is robot crazy, and you can buy a basic motorized or unmotorized robot for parts, building on it and adding sophistication and features. Snap or screwtogether kits, such as the venerable Erector set, let you use premachined parts for your own creations. And some kits, like LEGO and Robotix, are even designed to create futuristic motorized robots and vehicles. You can use the parts in the kits as-is or cannibalize them, modifying them in any way you see fit. Because the parts already come in the exact or approximate shape you need, the construction of your own robots is greatly simplified. About the only disadvantage to using toys as the basis for more advanced robots is that the plastic and lightweight metal used in the kits and finished products are not suitable for a homemade robot of any significant size or strength. You are pretty much confined to building small minibot or scooterbot-type robots from toy parts. Even so, you can sometimes apply toy parts to robot subsystems, such as a light-duty arm-gripper mechanism installed on a larger automaton. In the following sections, a number of different toys and building sets are discussed and their appropriateness for use as robots. Let s take a closer look at using toys in your robot designs in this chapter, and examine several simple, cost-effective designs using readily available toy construction kits.
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