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TABLE 13-5 OPERATOR =, = = <>, != > >= < <=
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Typical Comparison Operators FUNCTION Returns True if the values on both sides are equal Returns True if the values are not equal Returns True if the value on the left is greater than the one on the right Returns True if the value on the left is greater than or equal to the one on the right Returns True if the value on the left is less than the one on the right Returns True if the value on the left is less than or equal to the one on the right
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13.1 IMPORTANT PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS
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There are many forms of the while statement, including the until statement, which continues looping while the condition is not true and stops looping when the condition becomes true. These different types of statements are specific to the programming language. The final type of decision structure that you should be aware of is the select or switch statements which take the form:
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select (Variable) case Constant1: Statement1 Statement2 : case Constant2: Statement1 Statement2 : : endselect
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The select/switch statements allow you to avoid multiple if statements for different values of a variable. Usually the case value is a constant, but in some programming languages it can be a variable, a range of values, or a set of conditions. When you look at these examples and those throughout the book, you should notice that the code is indented to different points depending on whether it is part of a decision statement. This indentation is a programming convention used to indicate that the code is part of a conditional operation. You should make sure that you indent your code in a manner similar to that shown in this book to make your program easier to read and understand when you are trying to figure out what is happening for a specific set of conditions.
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13.1.7 SUBROUTINES AND FUNCTIONS
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One of the first things a programmer does when starting on a project is to map out the individual segments, or subroutines and functions (sometimes simply called routines) that make up the application. A subroutine is a block of code that can be selectively executed by calling it. Multiple calls can be placed throughout a program, including calls from other subroutines. Subroutines are meant to replicate repeated code, saving overall space in an application, as well as eliminating the opportunity that repeated code is keyed in incorrectly. Even the longest, most complex program consists of little more than bite-sized subroutines. The program progresses from one subroutine to the next in an orderly and logical fashion. A subroutine is any self-contained segment of code that performs a basic action. In the context of robot control programs, a subroutine can be a single command or a much larger action. Suppose your program controls a robot that you want to wander around a room, reversing its direction whenever it bumps into something. Such a program could be divided into three distinct subroutines:
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Subroutine 1. Drive forward. This is the default action or behavior of the bot. Subroutine 2. Sense bumper collision. This subroutine checks to see if one of the bumper switches on the robot has been activated. Subroutine 3. Reverse direction. This occurs after the robot has smashed into an object, in response to a bumper collision.
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PROGRAMMING FUNDAMENTALS
There are two different ways to implement a subroutine in a programming language. The first is to call a label, which executes until a return statement is executed. The second way is to create a procedural subroutine, which is physically separate from the caller. The first method is implemented directly in code like:
: call Routine1 ' Call the Routine : <= Execution Returns here after Call : Routine1: ' Routine Label : return ' Return to Statement After call
This is the simplest implementation of a subroutine and is used in many beginner programming languages, including PBASIC. Procedural subroutines are physically separate from the executing code. In the previous code example, if execution continues it will execute the code at Routine1 without calling it. After executing the code of Routine1, it will attempt to return to the statement after the call statement and could end up executing somewhere randomly in the application and will definitely execute in a way that you are not expecting. A consequence of being physically separate from the caller, a procedural subroutine will have to have different parameters passed to it, which will be used by the subroutine. These parameters are the input data for the subroutine to execute; in the simple call label type of subroutine, the parameters are the program variables that are shared between the main line of the program and the subroutines. The procedural subroutine looks like:
: PRoutine1(Parameter1, Parameter2) ' Call the Routine : <= Execution Returns here after Call : PRoutine1(typedef Parameter1, typedef Parameter2) ' Entry Point : END PRoutine1 ' Procedural Routine End/Return Point
Looking at this example, the values of Parameter1 and Parameter2 are unique to PRoutine1 and the instance in which it is being called. They are known as local variables and, along with any other variables declared inside the procedural routine, can only be accessed by code within this routine. Global variables are declared outside of any procedure and can be accessed by any subroutine in the application. While the parameters were described as a consequence of procedural subroutines, they are actually an advantage because they eliminate the need for keeping track of the global variables used as parameters and making sure they are not inadvertently changed in the program. Rather than being a consequence, the parameters and local variables are actually an advantage as they will make your software easier to write. Changing a variable value in a straight call/return subroutine is quite simple and can be accomplished in a procedural subroutine by accessing a global variable. A better way of changing a variable value in a procedural language is to use a function, which is a special type of subroutine that returns a value to the caller. For example:
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